When to Drop Your Listing Price

Though low inventory is prompting buyers to raise their offers in order to beat out competitors, you still want your sellers to know: an overpriced listing will linger on the market. Buyers pay attention to time on market and may erroneously assume something is wrong with a property that has gone “stale.” Real estate pros say it’s critical to determine what time frame is considered stale in your market and drop the price of your listing before getting to that pivotal moment.

Soaring home prices may make buyers pause, but houses are still selling fast. Nationwide, the average time a home spent on the market was 34 days in September, down from 39 days a year prior, according to the National Association of REALTORS®. Some sellers may be adamant about “testing the market” with a high asking price, so you should have a game plan for what to do if it backfires.

Source: “How to Know When to Drop the Asking Price on Your Home,” CNBC (Oct. 27, 2017)

Home Loan Rates Jump to 3-Month High

Mortgage rates reached their highest averages since July this week.

“The 30-year mortgage rate followed suit, increasing 6 basis points to 3.94 percent. Today’s survey rate is the highest rate in three months,”  says Sean Becketti, Freddie Mac’s chief economist.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending Oct. 26:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.94 percent, with an average 0.5 point, rising from last week’s 3.88 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.47 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.25 percent, with an average 0.5 point, increasing from 3.19 percent last week. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 2.78 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

Wildfire Victims Get ‘Mortgage Reprieve’

Homeowners affected by the California wildfires may be eligible to defer their mortgage payments for up to 12 months. Mortgage financing giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac have issued guidelines for wildfire victims with single-family mortgages.

Victims may be eligible to stop making mortgage payments in three-month intervals, up to 12 months. They also may be eligible to avoid late fees during this temporary payment break, and to not have delinquencies reported to the credit bureaus.

Mortgage servicers have been authorized by Fannie and Freddie to suspend or reduce a homeowner’s mortgage payments immediately for up to 90 days without any contact from the homeowner if the servicer believes the homeowner has been affected by the disaster. For any additional payment forbearance of up to 12 months, homeowners will need to reach out to their lenders. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac provide disaster relief information.

Also, HUD’s Section 203(h) program provides FHA insurance to disaster victims who have lost their homes and now face the task of rebuilding or buying another home. Borrowers with FHA-approved lenders may be eligible for 100 percent financing, including closing costs.

Source: “HUD Announces Disaster Help for Wildfire Victims,” Napa Valley Register (Oct. 19, 2017); “Fannie Mae Reminds Homeowners and Servicers of Mortgage Assistance Options for Areas Affected by California Wildfires,” Fannie Mae (Oct. 13, 2017); “Freddie Mac Confirms Disaster Relief Policies Amid California Wildfires,” Freddie Mac (Oct. 13, 2017)

Survey: Buyers Leery of Online Mortgage Info.

Consumers trust real estate professionals and lenders more than online sources or family and friends when it comes to obtaining information about mortgages, according to a new Fannie Mae survey based on 1,000 responses. Recent home buyers surveyed, including younger age groups, say they consulted multiple sources of information about the mortgage process but found lenders and real estate agents to be more credible than mobile apps, websites, and social media.

Though survey respondents say online sources are more convenient, they indicated a higher level of confidence in getting information through person-to-person interaction. However, home buyers do report using online sources to shop for a home much more often than to shop for a mortgage, according to the survey.

Source: “Lenders and Real Estate Agents Still Beat Online Sources as Top Mortgage Influencers,” Fannie Mae National Housing Survey (Oct. 19, 2017)

Mortgage Rates Ease This Week

Borrowers may be able to lock in lower interest rates this week, as the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage dips to a 3.88 percent average.

“Rates came down slightly this week, ending a brief two-week streak of increases,” says Sean Becketti, Freddie Mac’s chief economist.

Freddie  Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending Oct. 19:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.88 percent, with an average 0.5 point, falling from last week’s 3.91 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.52 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.19 percent, with an average 0.5 point, dropping from last week’s 3.21 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 2.79 percent.
  • 5-year hybrid adjustable-rate mortgages: averaged 3.17 percent, with an average 0.4 point, rising from last week’s 3.16 percent average. A year ago, 5-year ARMs averaged 2.85 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

Home Loan Interest Rates Take a Leap This Week

Borrowers saw financing costs for a mortgage move higher this week. The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage posted its largest week-over-week increase since July.

“The 30-year mortgage rate increased for a second consecutive week, jumping 6 basis points to 3.91 percent,” says Sean Becketti, Freddie Mac’s chief economist.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending Oct. 12:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.91 percent, with an average 0.5 point, rising from last week’s 3.85 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.47 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.21 percent, with an average 0.5 point, rising from last week’s 3.15 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 2.76 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

Home Lot Sizes Shrink to New Low

Lot sizes on new single-family homes have reached a new record low. New homes sold in 2016 had a median lot size of 8,562 square feet, or slightly under one-fifth of an acre.

The median lot size fell to under 8,600 square feet in 2015, according to the Census Bureau’s Survey of Construction data. Lot sizes have continued to shrink since then.

Location plays a big role. For example, the median lot size in the New England region is nearly twice as large as the national median, exceeding a third of an acre.

On the other hand, the Pacific region—where densities are often high and developed land is more scarce—has the smallest lots. Half of the lots in the region are under 0.15 acres.

US regional differences map at: “Lot Size Is at a Record Low,” National Association of Home Builders’ Eye on Housing blog (Oct. 3, 2017)

Mortgage Rates Hit Highest Levels in 6 Weeks

The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage inched upwards this week, averaging 3.85 percent. It’s the highest average in six weeks, Freddie Mac reports. “After holding steady last week, rates ticked up this week,” says Sean Becketti, Freddie Mac’s chief economist.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending Oct. 5:

’30-year’ fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.85 percent, with an average 0.5 point, rising from last week’s 3.83 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.42 percent.

’15-year’ fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.15 percent, with an average 0.5 point, rising from last week’s 3.13 percent. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 2.72 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

Home Loan Interest Rates Stuck in Holding Pattern

Mortgage  rates barely budged this week, staying well below the 4 percent mark. “Rates held relatively flat this week,” says Freddie Mac Chief Economist Sean Becketti. “The 10-year Treasury yield fell just 1 basis point, while the 30-year mortgage rate remained unchanged at 3.83 percent.”

Freddie Mac reported the following national averages for the week ending Sept. 28:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.83 percent, with an average 0.6 point, holding the same as last week. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.42 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.13 percent, with an average 0.5 point, also holding the same average as last week. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 2.72 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

Mortgage Rates End 2-Month Decline

The 30-year mortgage rate posted its first increase in several weeks after hovering near historic lows for much of the summer.

Freddie Mac reported the following national averages for the week ending Sept. 21:

’30-year’ fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.83 percent, with an average 0.5 point, rising from last week’s 3.78 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.48 percent.

’15-year’ fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.13 percent, with an average 0.5 point, increasing from last week’s 3.08 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 2.76 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac