Rates Drop to 2-Year Lows

This marks the sixth consecutive weekly decline for mortgage rates, leaving some borrowers wondering how low will they go. The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage averaged 3.82% this week, the lowest average since September 2017.

“While the drop in mortgage rates is a good opportunity for consumers to save on their mortgage payment, our research indicates that there can be a wider dispersion among mortgage rate offers,” says Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist. “By shopping around and getting a single additional mortgage rate quote, a borrower can save an average of $1,500.”

Freddie Mac reports the following rates for the week ending June 6:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.82%, with an average 0.5 point, falling from last week’s 3.99%. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 4.54%.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.28%, with an average 0.5 point, falling from last week’s 3.46% average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 4.01%.
Source: Freddie Mac

Home Loan Interest Rates Update

Home buyers saw mortgage rates edge lower again this week, with rates remaining well below year ago levels.

“While signals from the financial markets are flashing caution signs, the real economy remains on solid ground with steady job growth and five-decade low unemployment rates, which will drive up home sales this summer,” said Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist.

Freddie Mac reported the following national averages for the week ending May 16:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages averaged 4.07 percent, with an average 0.5 point, dropping from last week’s 4.10 percent average. A year ago, 30-year rates averaged 4.61 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages averaged 3.53 percent, with an average 0.4 point, falling from last week’s 3.57 percent average. A year ago, was 4.08 percent.
Source: Freddie Mac

Young Adults Living With Parents’

More young adults are still living with their parents and not branching out on their own, and that could have a long-term, negative impact to their finances, according to a new study from the Urban Institute. Researchers found there is no long-term advantage financially for young adults who live with their parents.

The share of young adults aged 25 to 34 who live with their parents rose from nearly 12 percent in 2000 to 22 percent in 2017. Young adults who stayed in their parents’ home longer did not end up buying more expensive homes or have lower mortgage debts later on than those young adults who moved out earlier, the study showed. Researchers say this suggests that “living with parents does not better position young adults for home ownership, a critical source of future wealth, and may have negative long-term consequences for independent household formation.”

Source: “Young Adults Living in Parents’ Basements,” Urban Institute (January 2019)

Mortgage Rates Inch Up, But ‘Don’t Be Worried’

After weeks of moderating, mortgage rates moved up slightly this week. But aspiring home buyers may be able to breathe a sigh of relief: Freddie Mac economists revised their forecasts this week to predict 30-year fixed-rate mortgages to average below the 5 percent threshold for at least the next two years. “However, softening house price appreciation along with increasing inventory of homes on the market and historically low mortgage rates should give a boost to the spring home buying season,” says Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist.

The following are the national averages for the week ending Jan. 31:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.46 percent, with an average 0.5 point, rising from last week’s 4.45 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 4.22 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.89 percent, with an average 0.4 point, increasing from last week’s 3.88 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 3.68 percent.
Source: Freddie Mac

Will Lower Rates Escalate Sales?

The real estate industry will soon see what kind of impact weeks of declining mortgage rates have had on home sales. Will it provide the boost some experts are predicting?

Since early November, the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage has fallen nearly half a percentage point, from 4.94 percent to 4.45 percent, at the end of this week. This could provide an important incentive for potential home buyers to make a move. The 30-year rate, which didn’t budge in the latest week of reporting, was on a downward trend for six consecutive weeks prior. Existing-home sales in November were already bouncing back from unusually low volume in the summer months, gaining 1.9 percent month over month, due largely to stability in the overall economy, according to data from the National Association of REALTORS®. But when NAR’s data for December existing-home sales is released next Tuesday, it may reveal whether lower mortgage rates have escalated sales gains.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending Jan. 17:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.45 percent, with an average 0.4 point, unchanged from last week’s average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 4.04 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.88 percent, with an average 0.4 point, dropping from last week’s 3.89 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 3.49 percent.
Source: Freddie Mac; “The slowing U.S. housing market may have finally bottomed,” Yahoo! Finance (Jan. 17, 2019)

Here Comes a Buyer’s Market

A power shift is occurring in the housing market with more negotiating power landing on the buyer’s side.

The National Association of REALTORS® recently reported an uptick in inventory entering more markets as more homeowners put their homes up for sale. Plus, buyers are having more choice, prompting some sellers to lower their asking prices due to the added competition, according to CoreLogic researchers.

“Given the 17 million more jobs now compared to the turn of the century, home sales are clearly under performing today,” says Lawrence Yun, NAR’s chief economist. “That also means there is a steady longer-term growth potential.”

Holiday Gift: ‘Low Mortgage Rates’

Mortgage rates moderated this week after posting a big drop last week, and the Federal Reserve’s decision on Wednesday to raise its short-term key interest rate hasn’t had much on an effect on rates. (The Fed’s key rate is not directly tied to mortgage rates, but does often influence it.) Now’s the time to start a loan and home search.

Freddie Mac report of mortgage rates for the week ending Dec. 20:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.62 percent, with an average 0.4 point, dropping slightly from last week’s 4.63 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.94 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.07 percent, with an average 0.4 point, unchanged from last week. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 3.38 percent.
  • 5-year hybrid adjustable-rate mortgages: averaged 3.98 percent, with an average 0.3 point, falling from last week’s 4.04 percent average. A year ago, 5-year ARMs averaged 3.39 percent.
Source: Freddie Mac

Mortgage Rates Are Easing

Home buyers may be finding a window of opportunity to lock in lower rates. Mortgage rates fell this week, after several weeks of moderating, Freddie Mac reports.

“Mortgage rates declined this week amid a steep sell-off in U.S. stocks,” says Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist.

Freddie Mac report of mortgage rates for the week ending Dec. 6:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.75 percent, with an average 0.5 point, down from last week’s 4.81 percent average. Last year at his time, 30-year rates averaged 3.94 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.21 percent, with an average 0.4 point, falling from last week’s 4.25 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 3.36 percent.
Source: Freddie Mac

Labor Shortages Push Up Construction Costs

Builders are being forced to raise home prices and are having a more difficult time meeting project deadlines because of the ongoing labor shortage in the construction industry, according to the latest National Association of Home Builders/Wells Fargo Housing Market Index. Eighty-four percent of builders say they have had to pay higher wages to subcontractor bids, 83 percent say they have had to raise home prices, and 73 percent say they can’t complete projects on time without more manpower. The number of builders reporting labor and subcontractor shortages reached a record high in July.

“The steepest upward trend has been in the share of builders saying the labor/subcontractor shortages are causing higher home prices, which increased by 22 percentage points between 2015 and 2018—to the point where it is now nearly tied with higher wages/sub bids as the most widespread effect of the shortages,” NAHB reports on its Eye on Housing blog. The survey also shows other effects of the labor shortage, such as builders saying that, in some cases, they’ve been forced to turn down projects.

Source: “Housing Market Index (HMI),” National Association of Home Builders/Eye on Housing (September 2018)

Mortgage Interest Rates ‘Mostly Holding Steady’

Mortgage rates haven’t been this stable since the fall of 2016. Rates did inch up this week, but only slightly and are still offering prospective buyers a window of opportunity, says Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist.

The recent slowdown in price appreciation in several markets, mixed with these steady mortgage rates, is “good news” for many prospective buyers who may have been priced out earlier this year. “Given the strength of the economy, it is possible for home sales to pick up even more before year’s end,” Khater says. “The key factor will be if affordably priced inventory increases enough to continue this recent trend of cooling price appreciation.”

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending Aug. 30:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.52 percent, with an average 0.5 point, rising from last week’s 4.51 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.82 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.97 percent, with an average 0.5 point, falling from last week’s 3.98 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 3.12 percent.
Source: “Mortgage Rates Tick Up,” Freddie Mac (Aug. 30, 2018)