Delayed Ownership and Wealth Disparities

Millennials aren’t purchasing homes on the same timelines as previous generations, and that has some economists worried. The homeownership rate for millennials was 37 percent in 2015, which is about eight percentage points lower than Generation X and baby boomers when they were at the same age between 25 to 34, according to a new report released by the Urban Institute.

Economists point to several factors for millennials’ delay into homeownership, including their delays to get married (being married increases probability of owning a home by 18 percentage points), rising student debt, delayed child bearing, and increasing rents that are making it more difficult to save for a down payment.

But the Urban Institute’s report notes that such delays into ownership are sparking concern. Less educated young adults are falling further behind in homeownership, the report notes. The gap in homeownership rates between the more educated versus the less educated population has grown significantly, increasing from 3.3 percent to 9.7 percent between 1990 and 2015. “Less educated millennials could be falling behind homeownership because of their unstable incomes and rising rents,” the report notes.

Source: “Millennial Homeownership,” Urban Institute (July 11, 2018)

‘Tiny Homes’ May Have a Wider Buyer Pool

A new survey confirms that consumers are definitely intrigued by smaller homes, often described as less than 600 square feet. More than half of adults recently surveyed–or 53 percent—said “yes” or “maybe” when asked if they would ever consider the possibility of buying such a small home, according to a recent study by the National Association of Home Builders. That means a majority of adults would consider moving into a tiny home at some point in the future, the NAHB notes.

Younger generations tend to find tiny homes more appealing than older age groups. More than half of millennials and Generation X members said they were open to the idea of a tiny home. However, only 45 percent of baby boomers and 29 percent of seniors said they’d be willing to entertain the idea.

But local zoning laws may curtail the prevalence of just how big the tiny-home movement gets. However, there has been a recent momentum among some local jurisdictions to relax some of those restrictions.

Source: “Tiny Homes Have Potential Buyers,” National Association of Home Builders’ Eye on Housing blog (Feb. 7, 2018)

Retirees Still Face Years of Mortgage Payments

Fewer retirees own their home free and clear, as 32 percent of homeowners ages 60 to 70 say it will take them more than another eight years to pay off their mortgage, according to American Financing’s Retirement and Mortgages survey.

However, many say they intend to age in place, with 64 percent indicating they plan to remain in their current home. Seventy-one percent say they would prefer to make home renovations rather than move, even if a health issue affected their mobility and comfort at home. However, 48 percent say they are unsure what they would do if their retirement funds ran low, making modifications questionable?

“With so many older Americans carrying mortgage debt with them later in life—and many expressing uncertainty about their financial future—this could very well prove to be an increasing concern among retirees,” according to American Financing’s report. It highlights several options for retirees, such as refinancing a mortgage or reverse mortgages. The report showed that only 19 percent of respondents knew what a reverse mortgage is.

Source: “Does Your Mortgage Retire With You?” American Financing (2018)

Walkable Areas Are Getting More Competition

Older Americans are placing a higher value on living in walkable urban centers, according to a new survey of 1,000 respondents nationwide about their living preferences

A majority of respondents surveyed by A Place for Mom, a national referral service, said it was “very important” or “somewhat important” to live in a walkable neighborhood. They also sought neighborhoods with low crime and those that are close to family.

“It’s time to abandon the idea that only millennials and Generation X care about walkability and the services available in dense urban neighborhoods,” says Charlie Severn, head of marketing at A Place for Mom. “These results show a growing set of senior housing consumers also find these neighborhoods desirable.

The survey authors say it’s important for developers to consider creating multigenerational communities in suburban centers that place an emphasis on walkability. Walkability ranked high regardless of income level in the survey. Walkability ranked highest for those under 70 years old who were seeking senior apartments.

Source: “Seniors Want Walkability Too, Survey Says,” Curbed.com (July 25, 2017)

Study: Millennials Hold Off on Big Life Choices

Baby boomers and millennials have different attitudes when it comes to marriage, children, and home ownership. Researchers with the National Center for Family and Marriage Research at Bowling Green State University compared adults who were 25 to 34 years old in the 1980’s with those who are in that age group today. One difference they found is that millennials are getting married later in life. In 1980, two-thirds of 25- to 34-year-old’s were married; in 2015, just two in five were married.

Because baby boomers were more likely to get married younger, they generally left their parents’ home much earlier than millennials. Americans in their late 20s and early 30s who live with their parents or grandparents have more than doubled since 1980, notes researcher Lydia Anderson. In 1980, only 9 percent of 25- to 34-year-olds were living with parents or grandparents compared to 22 percent in 2015.

Millennials are also putting off having children and buying a home. Plus, lag behind baby boomers when it comes to marriage, children, and home ownership, they are more likely to obtain a college degree, the study notes.

Source: “Young Americans Are Killing Marriage,” Bloomberg (April 4, 2017)

Age 50+ ‘Real Estate Resources’

REALTORS® who carry the Seniors Real Estate Specialist® (SRES®) designation are specially qualified to address the real estate needs of those age 50+. SRES® designees recognize that a home often is the largest and most precious asset that baby boomers and seniors have.

Thus, SRES® designees bring a unique approach to each transaction and interaction with clients. They not only offer a deep knowledge of real estate and the local and economic issues shaping market trends, but they’re also educated on issues of particular concern to aged 50+ clients.

Their special skills help such clients look at the big picture, factoring in financial issues and current and future care needs, to ensure that each client arrives at the best decision about selling a property and finding a new home.

Ready to buy, sell, rent or relocate? Find an SRES® designee near you to get started! www.seniorsrealestate.com

How Much Space Home Buyers Really Crave

The amount of desired square footage can vary quite a bit among the different age groups, according to findings from the National Association of Home Builders’ “Housing Preferences of the Boomer Generation: How They Compare to Other Home Buyers.” For example, millennial and Gen X buyers desire the most space, at more than 2,300 square feet. Baby boomers and seniors, on the other hand, mostly would be happy with homes that are under 1,900 square feet.

NAHB’s study also found that more than half of all home buyers across all age groups would like to have a home with three bedrooms. Thirty percent of respondents say they’d prefer four bedrooms or more. Millennials and Gen X’ers are most likely to want a home with at least four bedrooms.

Take a look at the NAHB chart that shows the gap between current and desired home sizes among the various ages at:
“Housing Preferences Across Generations (Part II),” National Association of Home Builders’ Eye on Housing (March 17, 2016)

Home Features ‘Most Desired by Age’

Home buyers are demanding more home features that help them save energy and keep the home organized, a new study released by the National Association of Home Builders, “Housing Preferences of the Boomer Generation: How They Compare to Other Home Buyers” reveals.

However, the generations – millennials (born 1980 or later); Gen X’ers (born 1965-1979); baby boomers (born 1946-1964); and seniors (born 1945 or earlier) – do show some differences in what home features they value the most. In a nationwide survey of more than 4,300 home buyers, NAHB pinpointed those differences and which features each generation most desires.

Home features most wanted by each generation detailed at: “Housing Preferences Across Generations (Part I),” National Association of Home Builders’ Eye on Housing Blog (March 7, 2016), study source.

The Baby Boomers Are Driving Growth

Baby boomers are the “driving force” of household formation, which is critical for real estate demand, according to a new blog post at the National Association of REALTORS® Economists’ Outlook blog.

The highest gains in household formation have been by 65- to 74-year-olds, who accounted for 860,000 new households alone from the first half of 2014 to first half of 2015, according to Census Bureau data. The 55 to 64 age group comprised the second highest at 391,000, followed by people over 75 years of age who formed 264,000 new households during that time period.

Meanwhile, younger age groups had less. The 20 to 24 age group had negative net household formation numbers of 85,000. The 25- to 34-year-old age group, however, had 159,000 new households during that time.

Young professionals have been slow to form their own households. The share of the population living with parents has risen dramatically over the last few years. For the 25- to 29-year-old age group, the percentage has risen from 10 percent in 1980 to 25 percent by 2013. Also, the share of 25-to 29-year-olds who have never been married has dropped from 70 percent in 1980 to less than 40 percent in 2013.

Source: “Baby Boomers Lead Recent Household Formation,” National Association of REALTORS® Economists’ Outlook blog (Sept. 25, 2015)

What Generation Faces the Most Financial Hurdles?

A recent Experian study finds that, among millennials (ages 19-34), generation Xers (35-49), and baby boomers, and the greatest generation (ages 50-87), generation Y has the biggest job ahead of them in terms of repairing their credit. They also have the worst credit scores of all groups combined.

“Given the significance millennials play in financial services and the credit marketplace, it is crucial to understand this influential consumer segment and how they use credit as a tool,” says Michele Raneri, vice president of analytics and business development at Experian. “While this generation may not look like they are on the right track financially, it’s important to keep in mind that credit scores are built on credit experiences, and while this generation has been slower to use credit, they have plenty of opportunities to build a positive credit history.”

Source: Experian