A New ‘2017 Low’ Struck with Mortgage Rates

The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage moved lower for the third consecutive week and set a new low for the year, Freddie Mac reports. However, with this latest jobs report out of the way, the runway is now clear for the Federal Reserve to raise benchmark interest rates when it meets June 13 and 14. Even before the Labor Department’s release on Friday morning, the Fed had been sending firm signals that its members viewed the economy as strong enough to withstand another rate increase.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending June 1:

30-year fixed-rate mortgages averaged 3.94 percent, with an average 0.5 point, dropping from last week’s 3.95 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.66 percent.

15-year fixed-rate mortgages averaged 3.19 percent, with an average 0.5 point, holding the same average as last week. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 2.92 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

Mortgage Rates Hit Lowest Averages of the Year

“As we predicted, the 30-year mortgage rate fell 7 basis points this week in a delayed reaction to last week’s sharp drop in Treasury yields,” says Sean Becketti, Freddie Mac’s chief economist.

Freddie Mac reported the following national averages for the week ending May 25:

’30-year fixed-rate’ mortgages: averaged 3.95 percent, with an average 0.5 point, falling from last week’s 4.02 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.64 percent.

’15-year fixed-rate’ mortgages: averaged 3.19 percent, with an average 0.5 point, falling from last week’s 3.27 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 2.89 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

Renters Admit They Favor Home Ownership

Seventy-two percent of renters “prefer” or “strongly prefer” to own a home rather than rent one, according to the latest SCE Housing Survey conducted by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.

Nearly 56 percent of renters view homeownership as a “good investment,” the survey finds.

The majority of renters favor homeownership, despite expressing concerns about their ability to one day afford a home. However, they do believe it’s getting easier to qualify for a mortgage. Sixty-five percent of renters say qualifying for a mortgage is “somewhat difficult” or “very difficult,” but that is gradually declining. Twenty percent of renters view qualifying for a mortgage as “somewhat easy” or “very easy,” which is up from 15 percent in 2015.

Source: “Home Price Growth Expectations to Increase: Renters Perceive Easier Access to Mortgage Credit,” Federal Reserve Bank of New York (May 11, 2017)

Mortgage Rates Set a New 2017 Low This Week

The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage continues to drop this week, setting a new low for 2017, Freddie Mac reports in its weekly mortgage market survey. For the fourth consecutive week rates have fallen.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending April 13, 2017:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages averaged 4.08 percent, with an average 0.5 point, falling from last week’s 4.10 percent average. A year ago, 30-year rates averaged 3.58 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages averaged 3.34 percent, with an average 0.5 point, falling slightly from last week’s 3.36 percent average. Last year at this time, 15-year rates averaged 2.86 percent.
  • 5-year hybrid adjustable-rate mortgages averaged 3.18 percent, with an average 0.4 point, falling from last week’s 3.19 percent average. A year ago, 5-year ARMs averaged 2.84 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

‘Mortgage Rates Surprise’ They Near 2017 Low!

tThe 30-year fixed-rate mortgage dropped lower for the third consecutive week and neared its low for 2017, Freddie Mac reports in its weekly mortgage market survey.

“After three straight weeks of declines, the 30-year mortgage rate is now barely above the 2017 low. Next week’s survey rate may be determined by Friday’s employment report and whether or not it can sustain the strength from earlier this year.” says Sean Becketti, Freddie Mac’s chief economist.

Freddie Mac reported the following national averages for the week ending April 6, 2017:

30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.10 percent, with an average 0.5 point, falling from last week’s 4.14 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.59 percent.
15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.36 percent, with an average 0.5 point, dropping from last week’s 3.39 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 2.88 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

Home Loan Interest Rates Got Cheaper This Week

For the second consecutive week, average mortgage rates fell, lowering the borrowing costs.

“The 30-year mortgage rate fell 9 basis points to 4.14 percent, another significant week-over-week decline.” says Sean Becketti, Freddie Mac’s chief economist.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending March 30:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages averaged 4.14 percent, with an average 0.5 point, falling from last week’s 4.23 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.71 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages averaged 3.39 percent, with an average 0.4 point, falling from last week’s 3.44 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 2.98 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

Homeowners Don’t Want Cookie-Cutter Lawns

Homeowners are focused on making changes to their front yards so they’re markedly different from their neighbors’ yards and easier to maintain, finds the 2017 U.S. Houzz Landscaping Trends Survey.

Homeowners want their yards to look distinct. Only 6 percent of homeowners reported front yards that were nearly identical to those in the neighborhood after their outdoor project, compared to more than a third before the update (36 percent), the Houzz survey shows. Two in five owners say they wanted to make a statement with a new front yard that was “very” or “extremely” different from others in the neighborhood following their update.

More homeowners are turning to low-maintenance plants to enhance their front yards, along with native plants and those that attract insects and birds. More than half of those who updated their front yard say that beds or borders, shrubs, and perennials were the most important to improving curb appeal.

Source: “2017 U.S. Houzz Landscaping Trends Survey,” Houzz (March 29, 2017)

Hispanics Are a Growing Home Buying Force

While the national homeownership rate decreases, ownership rates among Hispanics are defying the trend with steady rises.

The Hispanic homeownership rate grew to 46 percent last year, topping previous highs of 45.6 percent in 2015 and 45.4 percent in 2014, according to the National Association of Hispanic Real Estate Professionals’ 2016 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report.

More than 7.3 million Hispanic households owned their homes in 2016, 330,000 of which were from new households formed in 2016. That comprises 38 percent of all households formed, according to the report.

“The significance of a strong desire for homeownership cannot be overstated,” the report notes.

More information at: “Hispanic Homeownership Rate Rises for Second Straight Year,” RISMedia (March 28, 2017)

 

This Is the Worst ‘Housing Drought’ Ever

The number of homes for sale is at the lowest level on record, according to the National Association of REALTORS®, who began tracking inventory 18 years ago. That means many home buyers likely will find fewer options this spring, and the homes that are being listed tend to sell fast and at a premium.

The lack of new-home supply is one culprit. Housing starts are only at about 75 percent of their historical average. Builders are focusing on pricier segments of move-up buyers, leaving a big void in the demand for lower cost homes that appeal to first-time home buyers. Builders blame the higher costs for land, labor, and materials as forcing them to concentrate on the higher end of the market.

Builders aren’t the only ones to blame, however. Investors purchased about 4 million distressed properties—mostly in the lower-priced starter home segment—during the housing crash. They have been holding onto these properties, continuing to rent them out rather than selling.

Source: “This Is What’s Behind the Severe Housing Drought,” CNBC (March 23, 2017)

ARMs Rise in Popularity as Rates Increase

More borrowers are turning to shorter-term adjustable-rate mortgages as interest rates rise, but that may be a riskier move than your clients realize. While these mortgages offer lower interest rates, the rates reset after a certain preset time. Still, a five-year hybrid adjustable-rate mortgage averaged a 3.28 percent rate last week compared to 4.30 for the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage, according to Freddie Mac’s weekly mortgage market survey.

The share of ARMs in total mortgage application volume has doubled to 9 percent since November 2016. The highest level of ARM applications since October 2014. “Home buyers in a strong housing market are looking for ways to extend their purchasing power, and ARMs are one way to do that,” says Mike Fratantoni, chief economist for the Mortgage Bankers Association. “While the ARM share got as high as 35 percent pre-crisis, it is really unlikely it will get nearly as high now, given [new] regulations, which effectively prohibit many types of ARMs that were prevalent then.”

Source: “Mortgage Applications Fall 2.7%, as Borrowers Turn to Riskier Loans,” CNBC (March 22, 2017)