Walkable Areas Are Getting More Competition

Older Americans are placing a higher value on living in walkable urban centers, according to a new survey of 1,000 respondents nationwide about their living preferences

A majority of respondents surveyed by A Place for Mom, a national referral service, said it was “very important” or “somewhat important” to live in a walkable neighborhood. They also sought neighborhoods with low crime and those that are close to family.

“It’s time to abandon the idea that only millennials and Generation X care about walkability and the services available in dense urban neighborhoods,” says Charlie Severn, head of marketing at A Place for Mom. “These results show a growing set of senior housing consumers also find these neighborhoods desirable.

The survey authors say it’s important for developers to consider creating multigenerational communities in suburban centers that place an emphasis on walkability. Walkability ranked high regardless of income level in the survey. Walkability ranked highest for those under 70 years old who were seeking senior apartments.

Source: “Seniors Want Walkability Too, Survey Says,” Curbed.com (July 25, 2017)

Is Calif.’s Housing Crisis Spinning Out of Control?

California has a severe lack of affordable homes and apartments for middle-class families, The New York Times reports. Their median cost of a home has surged to $500,000—double the national cost.

“The extreme rise in housing costs has emerged as a threat to the state’s future economy and its quality of life,” The New York Times reports. “It has pushed the debate over housing to the center of state and local politics, fueling a resurgent rent control movement and the growth of neighborhood ‘Yes in My Back Yard’ organizations, battling long-established neighborhood groups and local elected officials as they demand an end to strict zoning and planning regulations.”

The state has introduced 130 housing measures this year. Among one of the most recent actions, the Senate approved a bill to crack down on communities that have delayed or derailed housing construction proposals. The bill would restrict the ability to use zoning, environmental, and procedural laws to kill projects that may be considered “out of character” with the neighborhood. The bill is expected to be voted on again later this summer.

Source: “The Cost of a Hot Economy: A Severe Housing Crisis,” The New York Times (July 17, 2017)

Home Loan Interest Rates Push Above 4%

Average mortgage rates are moving up, posting increases for the second consecutive week.

“After fully absorbing the sharp increases in Treasury yields over the past couple of weeks, the 30-year mortgage rate has cleared the psychologically important 4 percent mark for the first time since May,” says Sean Becketti, Freddie Mac’s chief economist.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending July 13:

30-year fixed-rate mortgages averaged 4.03 percent, with an average 0.5 point, increasing from last week’s 3.96 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.42 percent.

15-year fixed-rate mortgages averaged 3.29 percent, with an average 0.5 point, increasing from last week’s 3.22 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 2.72 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

A New ‘2017 Low’ Struck with Mortgage Rates

The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage moved lower for the third consecutive week and set a new low for the year, Freddie Mac reports. However, with this latest jobs report out of the way, the runway is now clear for the Federal Reserve to raise benchmark interest rates when it meets June 13 and 14. Even before the Labor Department’s release on Friday morning, the Fed had been sending firm signals that its members viewed the economy as strong enough to withstand another rate increase.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending June 1:

30-year fixed-rate mortgages averaged 3.94 percent, with an average 0.5 point, dropping from last week’s 3.95 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.66 percent.

15-year fixed-rate mortgages averaged 3.19 percent, with an average 0.5 point, holding the same average as last week. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 2.92 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

Mortgage Rates Hit Lowest Averages of the Year

“As we predicted, the 30-year mortgage rate fell 7 basis points this week in a delayed reaction to last week’s sharp drop in Treasury yields,” says Sean Becketti, Freddie Mac’s chief economist.

Freddie Mac reported the following national averages for the week ending May 25:

’30-year fixed-rate’ mortgages: averaged 3.95 percent, with an average 0.5 point, falling from last week’s 4.02 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.64 percent.

’15-year fixed-rate’ mortgages: averaged 3.19 percent, with an average 0.5 point, falling from last week’s 3.27 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 2.89 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

Renters Admit They Favor Home Ownership

Seventy-two percent of renters “prefer” or “strongly prefer” to own a home rather than rent one, according to the latest SCE Housing Survey conducted by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.

Nearly 56 percent of renters view homeownership as a “good investment,” the survey finds.

The majority of renters favor homeownership, despite expressing concerns about their ability to one day afford a home. However, they do believe it’s getting easier to qualify for a mortgage. Sixty-five percent of renters say qualifying for a mortgage is “somewhat difficult” or “very difficult,” but that is gradually declining. Twenty percent of renters view qualifying for a mortgage as “somewhat easy” or “very easy,” which is up from 15 percent in 2015.

Source: “Home Price Growth Expectations to Increase: Renters Perceive Easier Access to Mortgage Credit,” Federal Reserve Bank of New York (May 11, 2017)

Mortgage Rates Set a New 2017 Low This Week

The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage continues to drop this week, setting a new low for 2017, Freddie Mac reports in its weekly mortgage market survey. For the fourth consecutive week rates have fallen.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending April 13, 2017:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages averaged 4.08 percent, with an average 0.5 point, falling from last week’s 4.10 percent average. A year ago, 30-year rates averaged 3.58 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages averaged 3.34 percent, with an average 0.5 point, falling slightly from last week’s 3.36 percent average. Last year at this time, 15-year rates averaged 2.86 percent.
  • 5-year hybrid adjustable-rate mortgages averaged 3.18 percent, with an average 0.4 point, falling from last week’s 3.19 percent average. A year ago, 5-year ARMs averaged 2.84 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

‘Mortgage Rates Surprise’ They Near 2017 Low!

tThe 30-year fixed-rate mortgage dropped lower for the third consecutive week and neared its low for 2017, Freddie Mac reports in its weekly mortgage market survey.

“After three straight weeks of declines, the 30-year mortgage rate is now barely above the 2017 low. Next week’s survey rate may be determined by Friday’s employment report and whether or not it can sustain the strength from earlier this year.” says Sean Becketti, Freddie Mac’s chief economist.

Freddie Mac reported the following national averages for the week ending April 6, 2017:

30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.10 percent, with an average 0.5 point, falling from last week’s 4.14 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.59 percent.
15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.36 percent, with an average 0.5 point, dropping from last week’s 3.39 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 2.88 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

Home Loan Interest Rates Got Cheaper This Week

For the second consecutive week, average mortgage rates fell, lowering the borrowing costs.

“The 30-year mortgage rate fell 9 basis points to 4.14 percent, another significant week-over-week decline.” says Sean Becketti, Freddie Mac’s chief economist.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending March 30:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages averaged 4.14 percent, with an average 0.5 point, falling from last week’s 4.23 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.71 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages averaged 3.39 percent, with an average 0.4 point, falling from last week’s 3.44 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 2.98 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

Homeowners Don’t Want Cookie-Cutter Lawns

Homeowners are focused on making changes to their front yards so they’re markedly different from their neighbors’ yards and easier to maintain, finds the 2017 U.S. Houzz Landscaping Trends Survey.

Homeowners want their yards to look distinct. Only 6 percent of homeowners reported front yards that were nearly identical to those in the neighborhood after their outdoor project, compared to more than a third before the update (36 percent), the Houzz survey shows. Two in five owners say they wanted to make a statement with a new front yard that was “very” or “extremely” different from others in the neighborhood following their update.

More homeowners are turning to low-maintenance plants to enhance their front yards, along with native plants and those that attract insects and birds. More than half of those who updated their front yard say that beds or borders, shrubs, and perennials were the most important to improving curb appeal.

Source: “2017 U.S. Houzz Landscaping Trends Survey,” Houzz (March 29, 2017)