Half of Home Buyers Fret About Down Payments

According to a new study, more than half of Americans who have or plan to purchase a home admit they’re concerned about the ability to afford a home in the current market. The study is based on a survey of 1,000 consumers and was released by national online lender Laurel Road. One of the biggest barriers to affordability, respondents said, is the down payment.

Nearly half—or 46 percent—of Americans say they are unfamiliar with alternative down payment options, according to the survey. Nearly three in five respondents plan to put down a traditional 20 percent down payment. Some may feel like they have no other choice. However, the median down payment for first-time buyers in 2017 was 6 percent of the total home price, according to the National Association of REALTORS®.

Source: Laurel Road Bank

Homeowner Equity Growth Streak Continues

Homeowners with a mortgage saw their equity rise 13.3 percent year over year, according to CoreLogic’s Home Equity Report for the first quarter of 2018, released Thursday. The average homeowner gained $16,300 in home equity between the first quarter of 2017 and the first quarter of 2018. That is the highest growth in home equity in four years.

Western states saw the largest uptick in home equity. California homeowners gained $51,000 on average in home equity, while Washington homeowners saw about $44,000 on average, in equity.

Source: “Homeowner Equity Report,” CoreLogic (June 7, 2018)

 

Home Loan Interest Rates Update!

“Mortgage rates so far in 2018 have had the most sustained increase to start the year in over 40 years,” says Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist. “Through May, rates have risen in 15 out of the first 21 weeks (71 percent), which is the highest share since Freddie Mac began tracking this data for a full year in 1972.”

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending May 24:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.66 percent, with an average 0.4 point, rising from last week’s 4.61 percent average. A year ago, 30-year rates averaged 3.95 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.15 percent, with an average 0.4 point, rising from last week’s 4.08 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 3.19 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

Mortgage Rates Hit Highest Level in 7 Years

“Healthy consumer spending and higher commodity prices spooked the bond markets and led to higher mortgage rates over the past week,” says Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist. “Not only are buyers facing higher borrowing costs, gas prices are currently at four-year highs just as we enter the important peak home sales season.”

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending May 17:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.61 percent, with an average 0.4 point, rising from last week’s 4.55 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 4.02 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.08 percent, with an average 0.4 point, increasing from last week’s 4.01 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 3.27 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

Mortgage Rates Barely Stirred This Week

Mortgage rates have mostly taken a pause after a series of rises in April. The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage averaged 4.55 percent last week, unchanged from a week ago.

“The minimal movement of mortgage rates in these last three weeks reflects the current economic nirvana of a tight labor market, solid economic growth, and restrained inflation,” says Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending May 10:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.55 percent, with an average 0.5 point, unchanged from a week ago. A year ago, 30-year rates averaged 4.05 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.01 percent, with an average 0.4 point, falling from last week’s 4.03 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 3.29 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

FHA Borrowers Get Help Funding Solar Panels

A growing number of lending programs are helping homeowners pay the upfront costs of solar panels. One lender, Guild Mortgage, an independent lender, recently announced a program that allows home buyers to lump the costs of solar panels into an FHA loan. California residents will be the first to have access to the program.

Guild Mortgage’s FHA Solar program follows Federal Housing Administration loan requirements and offers down payment options as low as 3.5 percent. The down payment is based on the purchase of the home before the panels are added into the cost of the mortgage. “This program will give more options to home buyers looking for solar because it gives them the flexibility to purchase panels and add them to any home they choose,” says Guild Mortgage President and CEO Mary Ann McGarry.

Other programs are also available for financing solar, such as PACE loans. Also, some homeowners fund the purchase of solar panels through a second trust deed.

Source: Guild Mortgage

After April Hikes, Mortgage Rates Slide in May

“While mortgage rates have increased by one-half of a percentage point so far this year, it has not impacted home purchase demand, which continues to grow this spring,” says Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist. “The observed buyer resiliency in the face of higher rates reflects the healthy economy and strong consumer confidence, which are important drivers of home sales activity.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending May 3:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.55 percent, with an average 0.5 point, dropping from last week’s 4.58 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 4.02 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.03 percent, with an average 0.4 point, rising from last week’s 4.02 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 3.27 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

Home Loan Interest Rates Surge to 4-Year High

“Higher Treasury yields, driven by rising commodity prices, more Treasury issuance’s and the steady stream of solid economic news are behind the uptick in rates over the past week,” says Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist. “Despite the increase in borrowing costs, demand for home purchase credit remains solid.” The Mortgage Bankers Association reported that mortgage applications were up 11 percent from a year ago.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending April 26:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages averaged 4.58 percent, with an average 0.5 point, rising from last week’s 4.47 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 4.03 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages averaged 4.02 percent, with an average 0.4 point, rising from last week’s average of 3.94 percent. A year ago, 15-year fixed-rate mortgages averaged 3.27 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

Home Loan Payments Up 13% This Year

Monthly mortgage payments have risen an average of nearly 13 percent nationwide over the last year—or an extra $168—as buyers grapple with both higher home prices and increasing mortgage rates, according to a realtor.com® analysis. Luxury buyers are feeling the worst sticker shock, paying double the rate. In the top 10 percent of the market, owners are now paying an average $241 more per/mo.

Mortgage interest rates are about a half of a percentage point higher than they were at the beginning of the year, and the Federal Reserve has signaled there are more hikes to come.

Different generations of home buyers may have varying tolerance levels for mortgage rate fluctuations. Millennials are pursuing homeownership at a time when interest rates are at historic lows, averaging in the 4 percent range, while older buyers remember when they were in the double digits. So for millennials, “even a minor upswing [in interest rates] may seem significant,” The Wall Street Journal reports.

Source: “Rising Interest Rates Squeeze Homeowners’ Budgets,” The Wall Street Journal (April 4, 2018) [Log-in required.]

Home Loan Rates Ease Slightly This Week

“Treasury yields fell from a week ago, helping to drive mortgage rates modestly lower,” asys Len Kiefer, Freddie Mac’s a economist. “The yield on the 10-year Treasury dipped below 2.8 percent for the first time since early February of this year. The decline in Treasury yields comes as investors move into safer assets amid increased trade tensions. Following Treasury yields, mortgage rates fell slightly.”

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending March 29:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.44 percent, with an average 0.5 point, dropping from last week’s 4.45 percent average. Last year at this time, the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage averaged 4.14 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.90 percent, with an average 0.5 point, dropping from last week’s 3.91 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 3.39 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac