Drop in Mortgage Rates = Higher Home Buying Demand

Mortgage rates declined this week, After several weeks of increases, the drop in mortgage rates is a welcome sign for home buyers.

The housing market continues to steadily gain momentum with rising homebuyer demand and increased construction due to the strong job market, ebullient market sentiment, and low mortgage rates,” says Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist. “Residential real estate accounts for one-sixth of the economy, and the improving real estate market will support economic growth heading into next year.”

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending Nov. 21:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.66%, with an average 0.6 point, falling from last week’s 3.75% average. Last year at this time, they averaged 4.81%.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.15%, with an average 0.5 point, falling from last week’s 3.20% average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 4.24%.
Source: Freddie Mac

“I Want to Buy a Home” Report

Many non-owners—those renting or living with someone else—are eager to buy a home. But their current financial situation is what is mostly holding them back.

The newly released “2019 Profile of Buyers and Sellers” report contained a new section this year, including a survey about non-owners and their views on home ownership. NAR released the report during the 2019 REALTORS® Conference & Expo in San Francisco this week.

But the main reason they aren’t buying yet is because they can’t afford to make the jump into ownership. “Making the largest financial purchase in one’s life relies on the financial strength to do so,” the report notes. Seventy-five percent of non-owners surveyed say they believe home ownership is part of the American dream. Eighty-one percent of non-owners say they want to own a home in the future.

Source: National Association of REALTORS®’

Mortgage Rates ‘Are Dropping’

The 30-year fixed-mortgage fell 8 basis points this week, averaging 3.57%, Freddie Mac reports. The lower rates are drawing out more home buyers in the fall market.

“The 50-year low in the unemployment rate combined with low mortgage rates has led to increased home buyer demand this year. Much of this strength is coming from entry-level buyers—the first-time home buyer share of the loans Freddie Mac purchased in 2019 is 46%, a two-decade high,” says Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending Oct. 10:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.57%, with an average 0.6 point, falling from last week’s 3.65% average. Last year the 30-year rates averaged 4.90%.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.05%, with an average 0.5 point, falling from last week’s 3.14% average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 4.29%.
Source: Freddie Mac

Housing Market Forecast is Bright

Freddie Mac economists predict that the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage will remain below 4% for the remainder of this year, which could continue to bode well for the housing market to ease affordability concerns somewhat for potential buyers.

With lower mortgage rates, economists are predicting that home prices will also moderate, appreciating at 3.4% in 2019, which is in line with long-term growth. Plus, Home Sales Up for Second Consecutive Month and More New Homes Are Entering the Pipeline)

Much of the high demand in the housing market lately has been coming from young adults. “The millennial cohort has now entered the housing market in force and is already driving major changes in buying and selling patterns,” Frank Martell, president and CEO of CoreLogic, said in a statement about its latest housing index that showed home prices moderating.

Source: Freddie Mac

Qualify for a Appraisal Exemption?

For the first time in 25 years, federal regulators are increasing the property value limit under which buyers of certain homes must obtain an appraisal as part of selling. Federal banking agencies have approved a plan enabling certain homes worth $400,000 or less to be subject to an evaluation rather than an appraisal.

For nearly a year, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp., office of the comptroller of the currency, and board of governors of the Federal Reserve deliberated on the proposed rule change, reviewing hundreds of comments from the public. Regulators finally approved the rule last Friday. The new rule doesn’t apply to transactions in which the buyer is purchasing the home with financing wholly or partially insured by a government-run or government-sponsored agency, including the Federal Housing Administration, Department of Housing and Urban Development, Department of Veterans Affairs, Fannie Mae, and Freddie Mac. As a result, the majority of residential transactions in the U.S. will not be affected by this new rule.

Home Loan Rates Remain Low

“Mortgage rates remained mostly unchanged this week, while mortgage applications rose 5.3 percent from the previous week,” says Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist. “The general decline in rates we have seen recently, combined with rebounding pending home sales, hint at a strong spring home buying season.”

Freddie Mac reports national rates for the week ending Feb. 28:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.35 percent, with an average 0.5 point, unchanged from last week. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 4.43 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.77 percent, with an average 0.5 point, dropping slightly from last week’s 3.78 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 3.90 percent.
Source: Freddie Mac

California Passes Solar Panel Law

Starting in 2020, all new homes constructed in California will be required to have between 2 kilowatts and 3 kilowatts of electricity sourced directly from solar panels. State legislators, whom have been considering such a measure for some time, officially voted recently to amend state building codes.

The new mandate, however, won’t be cheap to homeowners. The upfront costs of installing typical solar panels ranges from $8,000 to $12,000. The timing of the move also worries residents who lost their homes in recent wildfires in California because the mandate will add to their rebuilding costs.

Are Mortgage Rates Stabilizing?

Mortgage rates mostly held steady this week—and home buyers responded by rushing to lock in rates. “Mortgage rates stabilized the last couple of months as interest rate-sensitive sectors, such as new auto and home sales, have clearly softened the outlook for the economy,” says Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist.

Freddie Mac report for the week ending Nov. 29:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.81 percent, with an average 0.5 point, unchanged from last week. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.90 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.25 percent, with an average 0.4 point, rising from last week’s 4.24 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 3.30 percent.

Mortgage Rates Take a Breather

Mortgage rates mostly held stable this week, a welcome relief .

“Despite recent market volatility, mortgage rates remained steady this week,” says Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist. “The stability in mortgage rates reflects the moderation in inflationary pressures in the economy due to the lower oil prices and subdued wage growth. On the margin, lower energy costs are a positive for the home sales market, particularly for lower-middle income suburban buyers who spend proportionately more income on transportation costs.”

Freddie Mac reports the following rates for the week ending Nov. 15:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.94 percent, with an average 0.5 point, unchanged from last week’s average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.95 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.36 percent, with an average 0.4 point, increasing slightly from last week’s 4.33 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 3.31 percent.
Source: Freddie Mac

The Makings of a Buyer’s Market

Buyers are pulling back. Home prices have been rising too much relative to income for many would-be buyers to keep pace. Since 2011, the U.S. median home price has risen 55 percent while wages are up only 18 percent. Now, the Federal Reserve has become more aggressive against inflation; with several short-term interest rate increases over the past year. A monthly mortgage payment on a typical home today is $1,136, up from $639 in 2011.

And confidence is down. Only 38 percent of consumers today strongly believe it’s a good time to buy, down from 43 percent last year, and the numbers are lower for renters who don’t have equity to tap for a down payment.

With buyers stepping back a bit, inventory is no longer falling. New-home construction is increasing and more homeowners are considering listing. A recent survey NAR conducted shows 50 percent of consumers strongly indicate it is a good time to sell, compared to only 28 percent just two years ago. Most home sellers will also be buyers. With inventory expected to grow, prices will stop rising so fast. That’s a healthy adjustment. Buyers can soon resume their search for the American dream.

Source: magazine.realtor/news-and-commentary/economy/article/2018/10/the-makings-of-a-buyer-s-market?