‘Nonprime’ Loans Expand Mortgage Options

Subprime mortgages—which were blamed for sparking the last housing crisis—are reappearing, this time being dubbed “nonprime” loans. This lending option, which carries new quality standards, is growing for buyers who have damaged credit.

California-based Carrington Mortgage Services is one company expanding its nonprime loan offerings. “We believe there is actually a market today for people who want to buy nonprime loans that have been properly underwritten,” saysRick Sharga, of Carrington Mortgage Holdings, told CNBC.

Carrington Mortgage Services, which plans to manually underwrite each loan, will qualify borrowers with FICO credit scores as low as 500. The lender also will qualify borrowers who’ve had recent problems reported on their credit histories, such as a foreclosure, bankruptcy, or a history of late payments. But borrowers who are at higher risks will be required to make a bigger down payment, and the interest rate on the loan will be higher.

Other lenders also are getting into the nonprime space, including Angel Oak and Caliber Home Loans; more than 80 percent of Angel Oak loans are nonprime.

Source: “Subprime Mortgagees Make a Comeback—With a New Name and Soaring Demand,” CNBC (April 12, 2018)

‘Closing Home Escrows’ Times Lengthen Again!

Time to close on a mortgage loan is once again increasing. The average time in January climbed to 50 total days, up four days since the “Know Before You Owe” mortgage disclosure rules took effect in October, shows a new report released by Ellie Mae.

Over the past year, the average time to close on a loan has grown 10 days longer. In January 2015, the average time to close was 40 days, according to Ellie Mae’s report.

Also, Ellie Mae’s report showed the average FICO score was down last month, averaging 719 on closed loans (down from 722 in December). That is also the largest month-to-month drop in FICO scores since mid-2015, Ellie Mae notes.

Source: “The TRID Ripples: Time to Close Mortgage Loans Continues to Rise,” HousingWire (Feb. 17, 2016)

Buyers Overestimate Mortgage Requirements

Sixty-five percent of recent survey respondents feel home ownership is a dream come true or an accomplishment to be proud of. But when it comes to achieving that dream, many consumers may sit on the sidelines because they’re overestimating what it takes to make it come true. So, contact us or a lender for current guidelines of home buying.

Many consumers have misperceptions about the credit score, down payment, and income requirements needed to qualify for a mortgage, according to a survey released by Wells Fargo and Ipsos Public Affairs of more than 2,000 U.S. adults. A high percentage of home owners are still unaware of recent efforts by lenders and the government to enhance the availability of credit through lower down payment programs.

Also, the survey found that consumers tend to overestimate the down payment funds needed to qualify for a home loan. Thirty-six percent of respondents said they believe a 20 percent down payment is always required, the survey showed. However, down payment options are available as low as 3 percent or no down for some loan programs.

Source: “Consumers’ Misconceptions Temper Desire for Home Ownership,” Business Wire (June 16, 2015)