What Generation Faces the Most Financial Hurdles?

A recent Experian study finds that, among millennials (ages 19-34), generation Xers (35-49), and baby boomers, and the greatest generation (ages 50-87), generation Y has the biggest job ahead of them in terms of repairing their credit. They also have the worst credit scores of all groups combined.

“Given the significance millennials play in financial services and the credit marketplace, it is crucial to understand this influential consumer segment and how they use credit as a tool,” says Michele Raneri, vice president of analytics and business development at Experian. “While this generation may not look like they are on the right track financially, it’s important to keep in mind that credit scores are built on credit experiences, and while this generation has been slower to use credit, they have plenty of opportunities to build a positive credit history.”

Source: Experian

 

Generational Differences Drive Housing Preferences?

Younger home buyers tend to view their home as a strong investment, more so than older buyers who tend to view their homes as a match to their lifestyle, according to the 2014 NAR Home Buyer and Seller Generational Trends study, based on a survey of more than 8,700 responses from buyers and sellers.

The survey provided an look at generational differences of recent buyers and sellers.

The largest group of recent buyers is millennials, those under the age of 34, comprising 31 percent of recent home purchases, according to the survey. Generation X buyers, born between 1965 and 1979, accounted for 30 percent of recent purchases, and younger boomers, born between 1955 and 1964, accounted for 16 percent.

“Given that millennials are the largest generation in history after the baby boomers, it means there is a potential for strong underlying demand,” says Lawrence Yun, NAR’s chief economist. “Moreover, their aspiration and the long-term investment aspect to owning a home remain solid among young people. However, the challenges of tight credit, limited inventory, eroding affordability, and high debt loads have limited the capacity of young people to own.”

Other findings are at survey source:   National Association of REALTORS®

 

Gen Y to Lead ‘Massive Increase in Housing Demand’

Watch out for Generation Y: This large, diverse, well-educated generation will drive the housing market recovery over the next 10 years, according to economists with the University of Southern California Lusk Center for Real Estate.

Gen Y (15-32 year olds) boasts about 77.4 million members, which is about equal in size to the baby boomers (46-64 years old). Yet, Gen Y is much more diverse and educated (60 percent of Gen Y goes to college), according to the center, which recently presented its findings at the USC Lusk Center Orange County Executive Briefing.

Stan Ross, Lusk Center Chairman of the Board, says that “baby boomers and Gen Y comprise 50 percent of the population and will soon be part of the largest U.S. wealth transfer ever.”

As more of this age group joins the work force, “they will produce a massive increase in housing demand,” forecasts the USC’s Lusk Center.

However, Ross points out “these kids are concerned. They have watched the stock market, financial markets, and economy wipe out their parents’ retirement plans. As a result, they will choose lower-risk investment strategies.”

Source: “USC Lusk Center Says More Educated, Diverse Generation to Drive Real Estate Recovery,” The Hoyt Organization (July 19, 2011) [No Link]

Other articles relating to the Sacramento and Placerville, California regions at: www.sierraproperties.com

7 Trends That Will Drive the Future of Housing

Hanley-Wood’s ProSalesOnline.com identifies seven trends that the magazine’s editors believe will have the biggest impact on housing in 2011.

1. Big builders are wringing the extras out of construction costs and dropping the national average cost-to-build 36 percent to $52 per square foot.
2. Starting in 2011, Energy Star will ramp up its efficient design and quality installation standards. To get Energy Star certification, builders will have to install the right insulation, HVAC systems, and other features related to energy efficiency correctly every time.
3. Sheds are the next evolution. As homes get smaller, a separate shed will become a popular home addition.
4. There are 81 million “Echo Boomers” who were born from 1981 to 1999, compared to just 78 million Baby Boomers born from 1946 to 1964. These children and grandchildren of Boomers will drive home-building for years.
5. By 2015, demographers say, more than two out of every five households occupied by Generation Y people born between 1981 and 1999 will be WINKs (women with incomes and no kids).
6. Make room for the “Sandwich Generation” – Baby Boomers living with both their kids and their parents. These families like having two master suites, a second cooking area, and lots of storage.
7. Baby Boomers want to keep working and continue to live where they have always lived. They want a first-floor master bedroom near the washer and dryer and lots of convenient storage.

Source: ProSalesOnline.com (October 2010)

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