Millennials Are Heading to Outside of Urban Areas

Millennials are leaving the city. While many millennials choose to live in urban areas as renters, when they’re ready to buy, they’re increasingly seeking single-family homes outside of urban areas, according to the 2016 National Association of REALTORS® Home Buyer and Seller study.

“The median age of a millennial home buyer is 30 years old, which typically is the time in life where one settles down to marry and raise a family,” says Lawrence Yun, NAR’s chief economist. “Even if an urban setting is where they’d like to buy their first home, the need for more space at an affordable price is for the most part pushing their search further out. Furthermore, limited inventory in millennials’ price range, minimal entry-level condo construction, and affordability pressures make buying in the city extremely difficult for most young households.”

The percentage of millennials purchasing a home in an urban or central city area fell to 17 percent in this year’s survey – down from 21 percent the year prior. 10 percent purchased a multifamily home, down from 15 percent a year ago.

Source: “Millennials More Likely to Buy in Suburban Areas,” RISMedia (March 9, 2016)

Generational Differences Drive Housing Preferences?

Younger home buyers tend to view their home as a strong investment, more so than older buyers who tend to view their homes as a match to their lifestyle, according to the 2014 NAR Home Buyer and Seller Generational Trends study, based on a survey of more than 8,700 responses from buyers and sellers.

The survey provided an look at generational differences of recent buyers and sellers.

The largest group of recent buyers is millennials, those under the age of 34, comprising 31 percent of recent home purchases, according to the survey. Generation X buyers, born between 1965 and 1979, accounted for 30 percent of recent purchases, and younger boomers, born between 1955 and 1964, accounted for 16 percent.

“Given that millennials are the largest generation in history after the baby boomers, it means there is a potential for strong underlying demand,” says Lawrence Yun, NAR’s chief economist. “Moreover, their aspiration and the long-term investment aspect to owning a home remain solid among young people. However, the challenges of tight credit, limited inventory, eroding affordability, and high debt loads have limited the capacity of young people to own.”

Other findings are at survey source:   National Association of REALTORS®

 

Generational “Home Buying Trends”

At 31 percent, Gen X comprises the largest group of recent home buyers, according to NAR’s Home Buyer and Seller Generational Trends report released today. Gen Xers were followed in numbers by Gen Y buyers (28 percent), and then younger Baby Boomers (18 percent), older Baby Boomers (14 percent), and the Silent Generation (10 percent). The Greatest Generation, also known as the G.I. Generation, represented less than 1 percent of recent buyers.

The report — a compilation of survey data from 8,501 recent home buyers — also shows that 80 percent of buyers who are aged 57 and younger bought a detached single-family home in 2012. Buyers over 57 are increasingly purchasing townhouses and condos.

The report also found that among all generations of home buyers, the first step in the home buying process is looking online for properties for sale.

Older buyers are less likely to finance their home purchase in comparison to younger buyers; when they do finance, the share of the home they financed is typically smaller.

Survey respondents cited benefits from working with a real estate professional. Among age groups, younger buyers are more likely to want their agent to help them understand the process as they are more likely to have never purchased a home before. Additionally, younger sellers are more likely to use the same real estate agent or broker for their future home purchases than older sellers.

When it comes to selling, Gen X is the largest group who are recent home sellers followed by both younger Baby Boomers and older Baby Boomers, the Silent Generation, and Gen Y. The G.I. Generation represented less than 1 percent of recent sellers.

Source: National Association of Realtors (NAR)