Investors Back Away From Home Flipping

Investors are retreating from flipping houses, showing skepticism that the practice will continue to pay off. About 43,615 single-family homes and condos were flipped in the first quarter of 2017, down 8 percent from the previous quarter and 6 percent from a year ago, according to ATTOM Data Solutions’ Q1 2017 U.S. Home Flipping Report. It represents the lowest number of flips in two years. ATTOM Data Solutions defines a flip as a home that has been sold twice within a 12-month period.

Home flips accounted for 6.7 percent of all single-family and condo sales for the quarter, one-third of which were purchased with financing. That’s up from 31.9 percent that were financed in the fourth quarter of 2016, setting the highest level since the third quarter of 2008.

More interesting ‘Home Flipping’ information at: ATTOM Data Solutions/RealtyTrac

There is ‘High Priority on Home Ownership’

More than two-thirds of Americans believe that owning a home is an essential part of the American dream, according to a new survey released by the National Association of Home Builders of more than 11,300 registered voters.

Other recent surveys also have shown a high desire for home ownership, despite the home ownership rate remaining stalled near a historical low of 64 percent. About 80 percent of millennials recently surveyed by rental website Apartment List say they hope to one day buy a home.

However, being able to afford one is the main obstacle, millennials say, that is holding them back. Thirty-six percent of the 24,000 millennial renters born between 1982 and 2004 surveyed said they’ll likely need to wait more than five years.

Source: National Association of Home Builders and “Wannabe Buyers Aren’t Saving Enough,” REALTOR® Magazine (5/30/2017)

Home Loan Interest Rates Are Still Dropping!

Good news, home buyers may want to rush to lock in: The 30-year mortgage rate hit its lowest level in nearly seven months this week, Freddie Mac reports.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending June 8:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages averaged 3.89 percent, with an average 0.5 point, down from last week’s 3.94 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.60 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages averaged 3.16 percent, with an average 0.5 point, dropping from last week’s 3.19 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 2.87 percent.
  • 5-year hybrid adjustable-rate mortgages averaged 3.11 percent, with an average 0.5 point, holding the same average as last week. A year ago, 5-year ARMs averaged 2.82 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

Homeowners Cash in on Equity in Droves

Homeowners may be reluctant to sell, but they still want to see a piece of that equity in their homes now. They’re cashing out in levels that have not been seen since the financial crisis. Nearly half of borrowers who refinanced their homes during the first quarter did a cash-out option, the highest level since the fourth quarter of 2008, according to Freddie Mac.

While the number of cash-out refis grows, Len Kiefer, Freddie Mac’s deputy chief economist, does not see this as playing out similarly to the run-up to the financial crisis when borrowers were using their homes like ATMs. Borrowers must follower stricter underwriting standards now when they refinance a mortgage or get a loan. Also, there is less money at stake than a decade ago, Kiefer notes.

Source: “Homeowners Are Again Pocketing Cash as They Refinance Properties,” The Wall Street Journal (May 27, 2017)

Foreclosures Plunge to Lowest Level Since 2005

Foreclosure filings—which include default notices, scheduled auctions, and bank repossessions—are down 23 percent from a year ago and have hit their lowest level since November 2005, according to the April 2017 U.S. Foreclosure Market report, released Thursday by ATTOM Data Solutions.

A total of 34,085 properties started the foreclosure process in April, well below the pre-recession average of more than 77,000 foreclosure starts per month between April 2005 and November 2007, according to the report.

More details at ATTOM Data Solutions and source: RealtyTrac

Home Loan Interest Rates are Barely Moving?

Mortgage rates were mostly in a holding pattern last week, which may have been welcome news to borrowers after the previous week’s uptick.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending May 4:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages averaged 4.02 percent, with an average 0.5 point, falling slightly from last week’s 4.03 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.61 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages averaged 3.27 percent, with an average 0.5 point, the same average as last week. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 2.86 percent, ARMs averaged 2.80 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

The Housing Market Is Outperforming Forecast

The housing market has been off to a roar this spring. In fact, the market is performing so strongly that the National Association of REALTORS® has upgraded its forecast for the year.

At the start of the year, home sales were expected to match last year’s pace due to higher mortgage rates and diminishing affordability. But the market is hardly slowing down, notes Lawrence Yun, NAR’s chief economist. He now predicts existing-home sales to rise by 3.5 percent, and home prices likely will increase 5 percent this year.

“With no imminent threat of a recession, the housing market’s strong first quarter sets the foundation for continued gains the rest of the year,” Yun writes.

Source: “First Quarter GDP May Be Cool, But Housing Market Downright Balmy,” The Hill (May 1, 2017)

Poll: More Expect Home Prices to Keep Rising

Sixty-one percent of U.S. adults believe home prices in their local area will rise over the next 12 months, the highest percentage since Gallup began collecting such data in 2005. Marking a difference between 2008 and 2012, when one-third of Americans believed home prices would increase.

Residents in the western region of the U.S. are the most optimistic, with nearly three-quarters of residents saying they expect price increases compared to slightly more than half of Midwestern and Eastern residents, according to the Gallup poll. With mortgage rates sitting below 4 percent, consumers may have more incentive to act now before home prices rise even more.

Sixty-seven percent of U.S. adults say now is a good time to purchase a home, which is down slightly from the 2012-to-2014 period when at least 70 percent said so. Unsurprisingly, homeowners (74 percent) are more likely than renters (56 percent) to say it’s a good time to purchase a home, according to the poll. Higher home prices and declining views of homeownership may be behind the dip in those who say it’s a good time to buy, Gallup researchers note.

Source: “More in U.S. Expect Local Home Values to Rise,” Gallup.com (April 24, 2017)

More Homeowners Tackle Renovation Projects

Homeowners are sprucing up their properties and undertaking more remodeling and repair projects, according to a recent study.

The Leading Indicator of Remodeling Activity, released by the Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard University, shows an annual growth in home improvement and repair expenditure this year that will remain above its long-term trend of 5 percent. Index authors, however, foresee a steady decline from 7.3 percent in the first quarter to 6.1 percent by the first quarter of 2018.

The National Association of Home Builders’ Remodeling Market Index also showed an increase in the first quarter of 2017, marking the highest reading in activity since 2015. The NAHB’s index shows that more remodelers are reporting that activity is higher now compared to the prior quarter. “A milder than usual winter has led to increased remodeling activity and a positive outlook for spring,” says Dan Bawden, the chairman of NAHB Remodelers. “Remodelers are seeing stronger market conditions with customers more willing to spend money on both small and large projects.”

—Melissa Dittmann Tracey, REALTOR® Magazine

Home Loan Interest Rates Drop Below 4%

The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage has fallen to its lowest average since November 2016, Freddie Mac reports in its weekly mortgage market survey.

“Weak economic data and growing international tensions are driving investors out of riskier sectors and into Treasury securities. This shift in investment sentiment has propelled rates lower,” says Sean Becketti, Freddie Mac’s chief economist.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending April 20:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.97 percent, with an average 0.5 point, falling from last week’s 4.08 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.59 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.23 percent, with an average 0.5 point, falling from last week’s 3.34 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 2.85 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac