Mortgage Rates Set a New 2017 Low This Week

The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage continues to drop this week, setting a new low for 2017, Freddie Mac reports in its weekly mortgage market survey. For the fourth consecutive week rates have fallen.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending April 13, 2017:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages averaged 4.08 percent, with an average 0.5 point, falling from last week’s 4.10 percent average. A year ago, 30-year rates averaged 3.58 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages averaged 3.34 percent, with an average 0.5 point, falling slightly from last week’s 3.36 percent average. Last year at this time, 15-year rates averaged 2.86 percent.
  • 5-year hybrid adjustable-rate mortgages averaged 3.18 percent, with an average 0.4 point, falling from last week’s 3.19 percent average. A year ago, 5-year ARMs averaged 2.84 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

‘Mortgage Rates Surprise’ They Near 2017 Low!

tThe 30-year fixed-rate mortgage dropped lower for the third consecutive week and neared its low for 2017, Freddie Mac reports in its weekly mortgage market survey.

“After three straight weeks of declines, the 30-year mortgage rate is now barely above the 2017 low. Next week’s survey rate may be determined by Friday’s employment report and whether or not it can sustain the strength from earlier this year.” says Sean Becketti, Freddie Mac’s chief economist.

Freddie Mac reported the following national averages for the week ending April 6, 2017:

30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.10 percent, with an average 0.5 point, falling from last week’s 4.14 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.59 percent.
15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.36 percent, with an average 0.5 point, dropping from last week’s 3.39 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 2.88 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

ARMs Rise in Popularity as Rates Increase

More borrowers are turning to shorter-term adjustable-rate mortgages as interest rates rise, but that may be a riskier move than your clients realize. While these mortgages offer lower interest rates, the rates reset after a certain preset time. Still, a five-year hybrid adjustable-rate mortgage averaged a 3.28 percent rate last week compared to 4.30 for the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage, according to Freddie Mac’s weekly mortgage market survey.

The share of ARMs in total mortgage application volume has doubled to 9 percent since November 2016. The highest level of ARM applications since October 2014. “Home buyers in a strong housing market are looking for ways to extend their purchasing power, and ARMs are one way to do that,” says Mike Fratantoni, chief economist for the Mortgage Bankers Association. “While the ARM share got as high as 35 percent pre-crisis, it is really unlikely it will get nearly as high now, given [new] regulations, which effectively prohibit many types of ARMs that were prevalent then.”

Source: “Mortgage Applications Fall 2.7%, as Borrowers Turn to Riskier Loans,” CNBC (March 22, 2017)

Mortgage Rates Retreat Slightly This Week

The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage decreased slightly, following two months of steady rises.

“The 30-year mortgage rate moved with Treasury yields and dropped 7 basis points to 4.23 percent. This marks the greatest week-over-week decline for the 30-year mortgage rate in over two months, a stark contrast from last week’s jump following the FOMC announcement.” says Sean Becketti, Freddie Mac’s chief economist.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending March 23:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.23 percent, with an average 0.5 point, falling from last week’s 4.30 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.71 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.44 percent, with an average 0.5 point, dropping from last week’s 3.50 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 2.96 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

Fed Votes to Raise Rates: The Housing Impact?

The Federal Reserve is picking up the pace, voting on Wednesday to raise its key interest rate just three months after its last rate hike. The Fed announced that short-term interest rates will increase by one-quarter of a percentage point and suggested that two similar increases likely will occur later this year. Mortgage rates aren’t directly tied to the Fed’s short-term interest rates but tend to follow them.

As of Tuesday, the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage averaged 4.39 percent, according to Mortgage News Daily. Last summer, rates were near record lows of 3.44 percent.

“Rising inflation will predominantly dictate the next monetary policy decision, but another short-term rate hike should be expected by the end of the summer,” Lawrence Yun, the chief economist of the National Association of REALTORS®, notes at the association’s Economists’ Outlook blog. “Right now, rents and housing costs are increasing faster than other components because of the stubborn housing shortages in much of the U.S. To contain inflation and slow the pace of future rate hikes, more home construction is needed now.”

Source: “How the Fed’s Latest Move Is Expected to Hurt Buyers,” realtor.com® (March 15, 2017) and “Fed Quickens Pace, Raises Rate 3 Months After Last Hike,” RISMedia (March 15, 2017)

This Could Boost Millions of Credit Scores

Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion announced they will soon remove tax lien and civil judgment data from some consumer credit records. The reason for this change is that many liens and most judgments fail to include vital pieces of information. Beginning on July 1, the public records data the firms use must include these data points: the consumer’s name, address, and either a social security number or a date of birth. Existing reports that fail to comply will be struck from the consumer’s credit record and new data that does not have that information will not be added.

Credit scores are weighed carefully by lenders in making decisions about loan terms and how much consumers can borrow, and can be very important in securing a sustainable mortgage. FICO estimates the changes will cause an improvement to about 12 million consumer scores; however the boost will be modest, likely less than 20 points.

In recent months, several lawsuits brought by states have been pushing credit reporting companies to remove some categories of negative data from credit score reports, such as information related to library fines or gym memberships. But some experts fear removing negative public record information could pose a greater risk to lenders.

Source: “Reporting Change Could Raise Credit Scores, Risk,” Mortgage News Daily (March 14, 2017)

What Has Analysts Worried With FHA Loans?

The number of riskier mortgages is growing, which is increasing delinquencies—albeit slightly—and raising concerns about defaults, USA Today reports. Federal Housing Administration loans, which typically require down payments of 3 percent to 5 percent, are at the center of most of the concern.

FHA-backed loans are becoming more available through non-banker lenders, who have in some cases eased credit standards compared to banks.

The big concern to many economists is if home prices peak and then decrease, homeowners who made a down payment of just 5 percent and are less creditworthy may be more likely to default.

But non-bank lenders say the loosening of FHA standards is a welcome sign and not one to fear. Your comments?

Source: “Concerns About Riskier Mortgages Are Sprouting,” USA Today (March 12, 2017)

Home Loan Interest Rates Hit 2017 High

For the first time in weeks, the 30-year mortgage rate moved with treasury yields and jumped 11 basis points to 4.21 percent. The strength of Friday’s employment report and the outcome of next week’s FOMC meeting are likely to set the direction of next week’s survey rate.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages rates for the week ending March 10:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgage (FRM) averaged 4.21 percent with an average 0.5 point for the week ending March 9, 2017, up from last week when it averaged 4.10 percent. A year ago at this time, the 30-year FRM averaged 3.68 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgage  (FRM) this week averaged 3.42 percent with an average 0.5 point, up from last week when it averaged 3.32 percent. A year ago at this time, the 15-year FRM averaged 2.96 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

Home Loan Interest Rates Are Holding Steady

Rates have mostly stayed flat the past three weeks, offering buyers a pause to steadily rising rates.

“Rates are at about the same level at which they started the year and have stayed within a two basis point range over the past three weeks. Mixed economic releases such as Friday’s jobs report and uncertainty about the Administration’s fiscal policies have contributed to the holding pattern in rates.” says Sean Becketti, Freddie Mac’s chief economist.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending Feb. 9:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.17 percent, with an average 0.4 point, dropping from last week’s 4.19 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.65 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.39 percent, with an average 0.4 point, falling from last week’s 3.41 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 2.95 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

From Boom to Bust? Farmlands Are In Trouble

Many farmers are facing higher debt as a multiyear drop in prices for corn, wheat, and other commodities plagues on. That is pushing more farmers out of business. The Farm Belt will soon have fewer than 2 million farms, the lowest in years.

Still, economists aren’t predicting the crisis to be as severe as the one that struck the Farm Belt in the 1980s, in which farmland values plummeted and interest rates soared.

Economists expect farmland values to fair much better this time around. After all, farm incomes had record highs in 2013. Many farmers still have significant cash reserves. Plus interest rates are still relatively low.

Lenders say farmers are going through their saving fast. They say younger farmers – without sufficient reserves — and large growers – those who may have expanded too much during the boom years — may be the most vulnerable. Large growers may have accumulated too much debt in recent years as they expanded operations and also locked into multiyear land leases at high rents.

Source: “The Next American Farm Bust Is Upon Us,” The Wall Street Journal (2017)