Hike in Mortgage Rates Reduces Affordability

Borrowers got stuck with higher mortgage rates again this week. Mortgage rates are now at their fourth highest level of the year, Freddie Mac reports.

“The higher rate environment, coupled with the ongoing lack of affordable inventory, has led to a drag on existing-home sales in the last few months,” says Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist.

The Federal Reserve this week voted to hold off on raising its short-term rate, “but the embers of a strong economy potentially stoking higher inflation, borrowing costs will likely modestly rise in the coming months,” Khater adds.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending Aug. 2:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.60 percent, with an average 0.4 point, rising from last week’s 4.54 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.93 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.08 percent, with an average 0.4 point, increasing from last week’s 4.02 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 3.18 percent.
Source: Freddie Mac

Federal Reserve Leaves Interest Rates Alone

The Federal Reserve decided Wednesday to hold off on raising its short-term interest rates. But it hinted that it likely will deliver its third interest rate increase of the year at its next meeting in late September. The Fed’s key rate does not have a direct impact on mortgage rates.

“Economic activity has been rising at a strong rate,” the Fed’s statement read. Economic output rose at a 4.1 percent annual rate in the second quarter, which is the highest three-month increase since 2014.

The economy, the Fed, and inflation all have an influence on long-term fixed-rate mortgages. Rates are rising, the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage averaging about 4.71 percent, up from 4.09 percent in 2015, CNBC reports.

Source: “The Fed Didn’t Raise Rates. How to Prepare for the Next Hike,” CNBC (Aug. 1, 2018) and “Federal Reserve Holds Rates Steady, Says Economy Is Strong,” The Wall Street Journal (Aug. 1, 2018) [Log-in required.]

Mortgage Rates Continue to Slide This Week

Mortgage rates this summer have been dropping the past few weeks after sharp rises this spring. “A record number of people quit their job last month, most likely for a new opportunity with higher wages and better benefits,” says Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist. “This positive trend, along with these lower mortgage rates, should increasingly give some previously priced-out prospective home buyers the financial wherewithal to resume their home search.”

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending July 12:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.53 percent for the week, up from last week’s 4.52 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 4.03 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.02 percent this week, up from last week’s 3.99 percent average. A year ago, 15-year fixed-rates averaged 3.29 percent.
Source: Freddie Mac

Mortgage Rates Fall to 3-Month Low

Mortgage rates were back down across the board again this week, offering some temporary relief to home buyers. Rates posted a rapid increase throughout most of the spring but have recently reversed course, declining in five of the past six weeks to the lowest average since April.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending July 5:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.52 percent, with an average 0.5 point, dropping from last week’s 4.55 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.96 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.99 percent, with an average 0.4 point, falling from last week’s 4.04 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 3.22 percent.
  • 5-year hybrid adjustable-rate mortgages: averaged 3.74 percent, with an average 0.3 point, falling from last week’s 3.87 percent average. A year ago, 5-year ARMs averaged 3.21 percent.
Source:

Falling Mortgage Rates Offer Affordability Relief

Mortgage rates declined this week, marking the fourth drop in the past five weeks, Freddie Mac reports.

“The decrease in borrowing costs is a nice slice of relief for prospective buyers looking to get into the market this summer,” says Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist. “Some are undoubtedly feeling the affordability hit from swift price appreciation and mortgage rates that are still 67 basis points higher than this week a year ago.”

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending June 28:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.55 percent, with an average 0.5 point, falling from last week’s 4.57 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.88 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.04 percent, with an average 0.5 point, which is unchanged from a week ago. Last year at this time, 15-year rates averaged 3.17 percent.
  • 5-year hybrid adjustable-rate mortgages: averaged 3.87 percent, with an average 0.3 point, rising from last week’s 3.83 percent average. A year ago, 5-year ARMs averaged 3.17 percent.
Source: Freddie Mac

Mortgage Rates Near Highest Averages of Year

Mortgage rates were back on the rise, increasing to their second highest level this year. The move follows the Federal Reserve’s vote on Wednesday to raise its federal fund rate by 25 basis points.

“The good news is that the impact on consumer budgets will be smaller than past rate hike cycles,” says Freddie Mac’s Chief Economist Sam Khater. “That is because a much smaller segment of mortgage loans in today’s market are pegged to short-term rate movements. The adjustable rate mortgage share of outstanding loans is a lot smaller now—8 percent versus 31 percent—than during the Fed’s last round of tightening between 2004 and 2006.”

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages with mortgage rates for the week ending June 14:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.62 percent, with an average 0.4 point, up from last week’s 4.54 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.91 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.07 percent, with an average 0.4 point, rising from last week’s 4.01 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 3.18 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

Is Break in Rate Hikes Significant to Buyers?

For the second consecutive week, mortgage rates decreased as the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage fell two basis points to average 4.54 percent, Freddie Mac reports. Rates had been on a steady incline for weeks before breaking trend.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending June 7:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.54 percent, with an average 0.5 point, dropping from last week’s 4.56 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.89 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.01 percent, with an average 0.4 point, falling from last week’s 4.06 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 3.16 percent.
  • 5-year hybrid adjustable-rate mortgages: averaged 3.74 percent, with an average 0.4 point, falling from last week’s 3.80 percent average. A year ago, 5-year ARMs averaged 3.11 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

Mortgage Rates Retreat From 7-Year High

After climbing to their highest level in more than seven years, mortgage rates eased a bit this week. It was the first time they declined in four weeks, says Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist. The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage fell 10 basis points to a 4.56 percent average this week.

“Extremely low inventory conditions in most markets are preventing sales from breaking out while also keeping price growth elevated,” Khater says. “Even if rates climb closer to 5 percent, sales have room to grow more—but only if current supply levels start increasing more meaningfully.”

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending May 31:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.56 percent, with an average 0.4 point, down from last week’s 4.66 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.94 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.06 percent, with an average 0.4 point, dropping from last week’s 4.15 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 3.19 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

Home Loan Interest Rates Update!

“Mortgage rates so far in 2018 have had the most sustained increase to start the year in over 40 years,” says Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist. “Through May, rates have risen in 15 out of the first 21 weeks (71 percent), which is the highest share since Freddie Mac began tracking this data for a full year in 1972.”

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending May 24:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.66 percent, with an average 0.4 point, rising from last week’s 4.61 percent average. A year ago, 30-year rates averaged 3.95 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.15 percent, with an average 0.4 point, rising from last week’s 4.08 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 3.19 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

Mortgage Rates Hit Highest Level in 7 Years

“Healthy consumer spending and higher commodity prices spooked the bond markets and led to higher mortgage rates over the past week,” says Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist. “Not only are buyers facing higher borrowing costs, gas prices are currently at four-year highs just as we enter the important peak home sales season.”

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending May 17:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.61 percent, with an average 0.4 point, rising from last week’s 4.55 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 4.02 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.08 percent, with an average 0.4 point, increasing from last week’s 4.01 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 3.27 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac