Don’t Panic Over Stock Market Mayhem

The housing market likely won’t be deeply affected by the sharp decline in stocks over the last two days because underlying economic fundamentals remain strong, says Lawrence Yun, chief economist for the National Association of REALTORS®. Jobs are being created, workers are seeing wage gains, and there’s no recession on the horizon.

The Standard & Poor’s 500 stock index fell by more than 4 percent Monday, and the Dow Jones Industrial Average declined nearly 5 percent. As of late Tuesday, the S&P was down by almost 1.2 percent since the first of the year, although that comes after a year of double-digit gains.

One metric to watch is long-term bond rates, which historically have gone up as stocks go down. That link, however, hasn’t been as strong in the past few years. Investors tend to increase demand in bonds as an alternative to stocks, driving up yields, which can lead to higher mortgage rates. Since the start of the year, the average rate on a 30-year mortgage has risen, from 3.95 percent to 4.22 percent, according to Freddie Mac. That’s still low by historical standards.

—REALTOR® Magazine

Home Buyers Don’t Grasp ‘Mortgage Basics’

Many Americans begin looking for a home to buy without understanding the fundamentals of applying for a mortgage or what it takes to qualify for one, according to a new survey by Ally Home, a direct-to-consumer mortgage business.

Ninety-two percent of the more than 2,000 U.S. adults who responded to the survey admit they don’t know how much mortgage they can afford. Further, most say they’re confused about “rates” versus “points,” and only a third have a general idea of what their average closing costs might be. Only 8 percent are aware that the maximum debt-to-income ratio is usually 43 percent; most respondents believe it’s significantly lower or don’t know at all.

Ally Home is touting its free Mortgage Playbook, a resource that covers the basics of applying for a home loan. The book uses sports jargon to outline the mortgage application process, covering topics such as how to improve your financial fitness prior to applying for a loan, how to evaluate rate and points options, and how loan rates are determined.

Source: Ally Financial

Have We Seen the Last of 3% Mortgage Rates?

Average interest rates rose for the second consecutive week for the first time since last summer, the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage shot above 4 percent, Freddie Mac reports in its weekly survey.

“This is the highest weekly average for the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage since May of 2017,” says Len Kiefer, Freddie Mac’s deputy chief economist. “Inflation is firming, the Federal Reserve’s Beige Book indicates broad-based economic growth, and labor markets are tightening. This means upward pressure on long-term rates, like the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage, is building.”

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending Jan. 18:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.04 percent, with an average 0.6 point, up from last week’s 3.99 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 4.09 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.49 percent, with an average 0.5 point, increasing from last week’s 3.44 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 3.34 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

Newbie Buyers Make Smaller Down Payments

About 60 percent of first-time home buyers put down 6 percent or less on a home purchase in September. The median down payment has dropped from 6 percent to 5 percent for first-time buyers, according to the National Association of REALTORS®’ 2017 Profile of Home Buyers and Sellers.

NAR conducted a survey of non-homeowners earlier this year and found that most consumers believe you need a down payment of 10 percent or 20 percent to buy a home.

“They may not be aware that these programs are available, and they may not be taking advantage of them,” Jessica Lautz, NAR’s managing director of survey research and communications, said in the latest Down Payment Report, published by the Down Payment Resource.

Thirty-two percent of first-time buyers said they saved for more than two years to have enough to buy a home. Student loan debt was the most often cited obstacle to saving. The second most cited barrier for saving was credit card debt.

Source: “The Down Payment Report,” Down Payment Resource (November 2017)

Mortgage Rates Mostly Flat This Week

Mortgage rates mostly held steady this week after posting a sizable jump last week.

“Following a strong surge last week, rates held relatively flat this week,” says Sean Becketti, Freddie Mac’s chief economist. “The 30-year mortgage rate remained unchanged at 3.94 percent.  The markets’ reaction to the upcoming announcement of the next Fed chair may impact the movement of rates in next week’s survey.”

Freddie mac reports the following national averages for the week ending Nov. 2:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages; averaged 3.94 percent, with an average 0.5 point, the same average as last week. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.54 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.27 percent this week, with an average 0.5 point, rising from last week’s 3.25 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 2.84 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

Mortgage Rates Hit Highest Levels in 6 Weeks

The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage inched upwards this week, averaging 3.85 percent. It’s the highest average in six weeks, Freddie Mac reports. “After holding steady last week, rates ticked up this week,” says Sean Becketti, Freddie Mac’s chief economist.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending Oct. 5:

’30-year’ fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.85 percent, with an average 0.5 point, rising from last week’s 3.83 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.42 percent.

’15-year’ fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.15 percent, with an average 0.5 point, rising from last week’s 3.13 percent. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 2.72 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

Home Loan Interest Rates Stuck in Holding Pattern

Mortgage  rates barely budged this week, staying well below the 4 percent mark. “Rates held relatively flat this week,” says Freddie Mac Chief Economist Sean Becketti. “The 10-year Treasury yield fell just 1 basis point, while the 30-year mortgage rate remained unchanged at 3.83 percent.”

Freddie Mac reported the following national averages for the week ending Sept. 28:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.83 percent, with an average 0.6 point, holding the same as last week. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.42 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.13 percent, with an average 0.5 point, also holding the same average as last week. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 2.72 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

Mortgage Rates Strike New 2017 Low

For the third consecutive week, the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage averaged a new year-to-date low.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending Sept. 7:

’30-year’ fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.78 percent, with an average 0.5 point, falling from last week’s previous yearly low of 3.82 percent. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.44 percent.
’15-year’ fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.08 percent, with an average 0.5 point, falling from last week’s 3.12 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 2.76 percent.
‘5-year’ hybrid adjustable-rate mortgages: averaged 3.15 percent, with an average 0.4 point, rising from last week’s 3.14 percent average. A year ago, 5-year ARMs averaged 2.81 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

Home Loan Interest Rates Hit New Yearly Lows

Average mortgage rates moved lower this week, as the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage continues to sit well below 4 percent.

“The 10-year Treasury yield fell to a new 2017 low on Tuesday,” says Freddie Mac chief economist Sean Becketti. “In response, the 30-year mortgage rate dropped four basis points to 3.82 percent, reaching a new year-to-date low for the second consecutive week.”

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the most recent week through Aug. 31:

30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.82 percent, with an average 0.5 point, falling from last week’s 3.86 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.46 percent.
15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.12 percent, with an average 0.5 point, falling from last week’s 3.16 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 2.77 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

30-Year Mortgage Rate Hits New 2017 Low

Borrowers applying for a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage this week locked in the lowest rate of the year, as it dropped to its lowest average since November 2016, Freddie Mac reports. Additionally, “the 10-year Treasury yield fell 6 basis points this week amid concerns over lagging inflation,” says Freddie Mac chief economist Sean Becketti.

Freddie Mac reported the following national averages for the week ending Aug. 24:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.86 percent, with an average 0.5 point, dropping from last week’s 3.89 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.43 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.16 percent, with an average 0.5 point, the same average as last week. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 2.74 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac