There is ‘High Priority on Home Ownership’

More than two-thirds of Americans believe that owning a home is an essential part of the American dream, according to a new survey released by the National Association of Home Builders of more than 11,300 registered voters.

Other recent surveys also have shown a high desire for home ownership, despite the home ownership rate remaining stalled near a historical low of 64 percent. About 80 percent of millennials recently surveyed by rental website Apartment List say they hope to one day buy a home.

However, being able to afford one is the main obstacle, millennials say, that is holding them back. Thirty-six percent of the 24,000 millennial renters born between 1982 and 2004 surveyed said they’ll likely need to wait more than five years.

Source: National Association of Home Builders and “Wannabe Buyers Aren’t Saving Enough,” REALTOR® Magazine (5/30/2017)

4 of 5 Americans Rate Housing a Good Investment

The majority of Americans say that owning a home is a good investment, according to a new poll of more than 2,800 registered voters commissioned by the National Association of Home Builders.

The survey found that 72 percent of Americans say that they support the government providing tax incentives to encourage home ownership.

However, obstacles still remain in their path, as well as for others too. Among all those polled, 55 percent say that the biggest obstacle to buying a home is finding a home at a price that they can afford. Fifty percent said they were prevented from buying due to insufficient savings for a down payment, and 41 percent say they are struggling to get approved for a home loan.

Source: National Association of Home Builders

‘Small Lenders Bend’ for Risky Borrowers

Borrowers with minor imperfections on their credit applications — like a brief loss of employment or a temporary dip in their credit score — are starting to have better luck at snagging a loan with smaller lenders, Bloomberg reports. At least 15 smaller firms this year are offering slightly riskier mortgages, which in some cases come with higher interest rates and larger down payment requirements and aren’t backed by the government.

“Some lenders became afraid of their own shadows,” RPM Mortgage Inc. Chief Executive Officer Rob Hirt told Bloomberg. The bank started a program this summer for borrowers who have higher debt burdens or who had sold a home for less than the outstanding mortgage. “The market is beginning to realize that if you make smart and sound loans to people who don’t fit in the narrow box, it doesn’t make them a worse risk.”

On the other hand, larger banks, like Bank of America and JPMorgan Chase & Co., have generally tightened their credit standards over the last few years. The average score on mortgages that government-controlled Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac bought now stands at about 740 – well above the 660 level that is considered subprime.

“To us, it’s common sense,” says Jeff Seabold, chief lending officer at Banc of California. “There’s quite a few people who are boxed out that shouldn’t be.”

Source: “You Don’t Need to Be Perfect to Get a U.S. Loan Anymore,” Bloomberg Businessweek (Oct. 13, 2014)

Generational Differences Drive Housing Preferences?

Younger home buyers tend to view their home as a strong investment, more so than older buyers who tend to view their homes as a match to their lifestyle, according to the 2014 NAR Home Buyer and Seller Generational Trends study, based on a survey of more than 8,700 responses from buyers and sellers.

The survey provided an look at generational differences of recent buyers and sellers.

The largest group of recent buyers is millennials, those under the age of 34, comprising 31 percent of recent home purchases, according to the survey. Generation X buyers, born between 1965 and 1979, accounted for 30 percent of recent purchases, and younger boomers, born between 1955 and 1964, accounted for 16 percent.

“Given that millennials are the largest generation in history after the baby boomers, it means there is a potential for strong underlying demand,” says Lawrence Yun, NAR’s chief economist. “Moreover, their aspiration and the long-term investment aspect to owning a home remain solid among young people. However, the challenges of tight credit, limited inventory, eroding affordability, and high debt loads have limited the capacity of young people to own.”

Other findings are at survey source:   National Association of REALTORS®

 

What do you want most once Finances Improve?

Information we’d like to share! Fifty-one percent of Americans in a recent poll say that if their financial situation were to improve, they’d buy a home. Coming in second on the list of wishes, they’d make repairs or improvements to the home they already have, according to the poll of more than 1,400 Americans conducted by the National Foundation for Credit Counseling Web site, www.DebtAdvice.org 

Meanwhile, 17 percent of Americans polled said they’d upgrade their car and 9 percent said they’d take a vacation. Please comment on what would be your decision?  

“Home ownership has traditionally been a part of sound financial planning,” says Gail Cunningham, spokesperson for the NFCC, a nonprofit credit counseling organization. “With a combined total of 74 percent of respondents selecting a home-oriented option, the poll results strongly suggests that people continue to place value in owning a home, and are anxious to buy a house or improve their existing one.”

Based on data from Melissa Dittmann Tracey for REALTOR Magazine Daily News

Boomers More “Willing to Help Kids” with Down Payments!

Two-thirds of baby boomers say they want to help their children or grandchildren with a home down payment, according to a study of more than 1,000 baby boomers age 45 and up conducted by Meredith Research Solutions.

In fact, one in five boomers surveyed say they’ve already loaned their children money, cosigned a mortgage, or given a cash gift for a down payment on a home.

Even baby boomers not considered wealthy are willing to offer help on down payments. While baby boomers who make more than $75,000 a year were found to be the most willing to offer help, 46 percent of baby boomers who make less than $75,000 per year say they also plan to help their child with a future home purchase, according to the survey. 

So why are baby boomer parents so willing to help their children out with a home down payment? About 75 percent of boomers said they believe owning a home is a good investment for their children, and 58 percent said they think it’s still part of the American dream. 

Source: “Survey: Most Boomers Would Cover Kids’ Down Payment,” AOL Real Estate (Nov. 30, 2011)

Other information about the Sierra Foothills, El Dorado, Placer, Amador or Sacramento Counties of California at: www.sierraproperties.com or www.dougandbudzeller.com