NAHB: Home Building Shortage Is Getting Worse

The inventory of for-sale homes has struck a 20-year low. And while economists and the public cry for more inventory, many builders are pressed to meet demand. A labor and subcontractor shortage in the building industry has worsened over the past year, according to the National Association of Home Builders/Wells Fargo Housing Market Index survey of single-family builders.

The NAHB posits that some workers who were laid off during the housing downturn never returned to the building industry or went to work for larger firms.

Builders reported widespread shortages for each of the 15 occupations surveyed as reflected by a chart in the following article source: “Share of Builders Reporting Labor Shortages Rises Again,” National Association of Home Builders’ (NAHB) Eye on Housing blog (Aug. 14, 2017)

Mortgage Rates at Lowest Point in 6 Weeks

The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage reversed course this week, averaging 3.90 percent.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending Aug. 10:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.90 percent, with an average 0.5 point, dropping from last week’s 3.93 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.45 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.18 percent, with an average 0.5 point, the same average as last week. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 2.76 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

A Cruel Season for Home Buyers

Typically, the housing market starts to slow in late summer, and prices drop slightly. But so far this year that hasn’t been the case.

“Homes are not selling faster than last July, but faster than last year’s peak months,” says Javier Vivas, manager of economic research at realtor.com®. “However, quick sales don’t necessarily mean more sales, particularly when there isn’t enough inventory, as is the current case. Home prices also remain stubbornly high, failing to show hints of the usual seasonal cool down. Low and moderately priced homes are being snatched up especially quickly, keeping many would-be buyers from being able to get into the market.”

“In this market, home buyers have to move fast, yet high prices and low inventory are slowing down even the most earnest of house hunters,” Nela Richardson, Redfin’s chief economist, told CNBC. “Faced with a low supply of homes for sale and extremely competitive conditions, many home buyers are struggling to make it to the offer stage.”

Source: “Housing Demand Strengthens Through Summer, But Here’s Why Some Buyers Are Giving Up,” CNBC (Aug. 2, 2017)

Walkable Areas Are Getting More Competition

Older Americans are placing a higher value on living in walkable urban centers, according to a new survey of 1,000 respondents nationwide about their living preferences

A majority of respondents surveyed by A Place for Mom, a national referral service, said it was “very important” or “somewhat important” to live in a walkable neighborhood. They also sought neighborhoods with low crime and those that are close to family.

“It’s time to abandon the idea that only millennials and Generation X care about walkability and the services available in dense urban neighborhoods,” says Charlie Severn, head of marketing at A Place for Mom. “These results show a growing set of senior housing consumers also find these neighborhoods desirable.

The survey authors say it’s important for developers to consider creating multigenerational communities in suburban centers that place an emphasis on walkability. Walkability ranked high regardless of income level in the survey. Walkability ranked highest for those under 70 years old who were seeking senior apartments.

Source: “Seniors Want Walkability Too, Survey Says,” Curbed.com (July 25, 2017)

Is Calif.’s Housing Crisis Spinning Out of Control?

California has a severe lack of affordable homes and apartments for middle-class families, The New York Times reports. Their median cost of a home has surged to $500,000—double the national cost.

“The extreme rise in housing costs has emerged as a threat to the state’s future economy and its quality of life,” The New York Times reports. “It has pushed the debate over housing to the center of state and local politics, fueling a resurgent rent control movement and the growth of neighborhood ‘Yes in My Back Yard’ organizations, battling long-established neighborhood groups and local elected officials as they demand an end to strict zoning and planning regulations.”

The state has introduced 130 housing measures this year. Among one of the most recent actions, the Senate approved a bill to crack down on communities that have delayed or derailed housing construction proposals. The bill would restrict the ability to use zoning, environmental, and procedural laws to kill projects that may be considered “out of character” with the neighborhood. The bill is expected to be voted on again later this summer.

Source: “The Cost of a Hot Economy: A Severe Housing Crisis,” The New York Times (July 17, 2017)

Home Loan Interest Rates Push Above 4%

Average mortgage rates are moving up, posting increases for the second consecutive week.

“After fully absorbing the sharp increases in Treasury yields over the past couple of weeks, the 30-year mortgage rate has cleared the psychologically important 4 percent mark for the first time since May,” says Sean Becketti, Freddie Mac’s chief economist.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending July 13:

30-year fixed-rate mortgages averaged 4.03 percent, with an average 0.5 point, increasing from last week’s 3.96 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.42 percent.

15-year fixed-rate mortgages averaged 3.29 percent, with an average 0.5 point, increasing from last week’s 3.22 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 2.72 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

The Real Costs of Tiny Homes

The tiny home movement—homes that often fall within the 100- to 400-square-foot range—is becoming more trendy as owners are drawn to the homes’ minimalism and sliced costs. But buyers may not want to count on cutting their savings by purchasing a tiny home.

A tiny home usually has more costs up front. If you build it yourself, the average cost is about $23,000, according to The Tiny Life. This usually doesn’t include the land price, so buyers will need to pay more to purchase a plot of land or lease land for the home. Additionally, about 68 percent of tiny home owners don’t have a mortgage at all, compared to just 29.3 percent of buyers of traditional homes.

Tiny-home living promotes less spending on utilities as an added perk, but buyers will need to watch those upfront payments as well. Tiny homes often use alternate forms of energy, such as propane, solar energy, or composting. Even for a tiny house, a solar-power system can cost about $8,000, according to The Financial Times.

Source: “Tiny House Living: How Much Money Can You Really Save?” CheatSheet.com (July 11, 2017)

Survey: More Buyers Make Offers Sight Unseen

The number of buyers making offers sight unseen—meaning they haven’t physically visited the property is on the rise, according to a survey of recent home buyers conducted by real estate brokerage Redfin. Thirty-three percent of respondents in 11 major markets say they made an offer on at least one house sight unseen. These types of offers are more common when working with foreign buyers and in markets where homes are selling quickly, real estate professionals say.

New uses of 3-D photos, video tours, and virtual reality are giving some buyers enough confidence to purchase a home without an in-person showing. The Wall Street Journal reports that some real estate pros are conducting property walkthroughs with long-distance buyers remotely via FaceTime, Skype, or WhatsApp. Some agents are working with technology companies to create 3-D photo and video tours within the virtual reality space to make long-distance buyers feel like they’re at the property in person.

Source: “Buying a Home Sight Unseen Is Easier Than Ever – and More Common,” The Wall Street Journal (June 22, 2017) [Log-in required.]

Retirees Look to Build Smaller, Custom Homes

Many people seek to downsize their home in retirement—but not their home buying wish list. Retirees reportedly are flocking to smaller newly built homes customized to their personal needs and tastes.

One advantage older home buyers find with these custom homes is that they can be built to accommodate medical conditions or physical restrictions, such as wider hallways to accommodate mobility devices. The home also can be outfitted with age-in-place features such as outdoor ramps and lower kitchen cabinets.

Retirees are looking to cut back on home maintenance and repairs, which is why their preferences are straying away from larger, older homes. However, building a custom home can be stressful because of the wide availability of options. Real estate experts recommend researching building plans and contractors carefully to make sure buyers get the type of craftsmanship they seek.

Source: “Retirees Turning to Custom Homes to Get the Right Space,” RISMedia (June 22, 2017)

After Steady Decline, ‘Mortgage Rates Rise’

Mortgage rates increased this week for the first time in more than a month, but they still remain near their yearly lows.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending June 15:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.91 percent, with an average 0.5 point, rising from last week’s 3.89 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.54 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.18 percent, with an average 0.5 point, increasing from last week’s 3.16 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 2.81 percent.
  • 5-year hybrid adjustable-rate mortgages: averaged 3.15 percent, with an average 0.5 point, rising from last week’s 3.11 percent average. A year ago, 5-year ARMs averaged 2.74 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac