Climbing Mortgage Rates at 4-Year High

Mortgage rates continued to inch higher this week, marking the sixth consecutive week for borrowing cost increases for home shoppers.

“Wednesday’s Consumer Price Index report showed higher-than-expected inflation; headline consumer price inflation was 2.1 percent year-over-year in January, two-tenths of a percentage point higher than the consensus forecast,” explains Len Kiefer, Freddie Mac’s deputy chief economist.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending Feb. 15:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.38 percent with an average 0.6 point, rising from last week’s 4.32 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 4.15 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.84 percent, with an average 0.5 point, increasing from last week’s 3.77 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 3.35 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

Is Market Volatility Giving Buyers Cold Feet?

It seems a 1,000-plus point drop in the stock market last week mixed with rising interest rates may have been enough to give homeowners and buyers the jitters. Overall mortgage applications last week dipped 4.1 percent week over week on a seasonally adjusted basis, the Mortgage Bankers Association reported Wednesday.

Broken out, mortgage applications for home purchases plunged 6 percent last week. However, that number is still 4 percent higher than last year. Home buyers complain of weakened affordability and lengthier home searches in research released this week by the National Association of Home Builders. Refinance applications dipped 2 percent last week, but they remain 2.8 percent higher than the same week a year ago.

Mortgage rates continue to move upwards. Last week the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage rose to its highest rate since January 2014, averaging 4.57 percent, the MBA reported.

Source: “Stock Jitters and Higher Interest Rates Drive Weekly Mortgage Applications Down 4.1%,” CNBC (Feb. 14, 2018)

Home Loan Interest Rates are ‘Pressing Higher’

The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage reached its highest average since December 2016, Freddie Mac reports. This is the fifth consecutive week that mortgage rates have been on the rise, increasing borrowing costs for home shoppers heading into the spring buying season.

Following a turbulent Monday, financial markets settled down with the 10-year Treasury yield resuming its upward march. Mortgage rates have followed,” says Len Kiefer, Freddie Mac’s deputy chief economist. “Will higher rates break housing market momentum? It’s too early to tell for sure.”

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending Feb. 8:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages averaged 4.32 percent, with an average 0.6 point, rising from last week’s 4.22 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 4.17 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages averaged 3.77 percent, with an average 0.5, up from a 3.68 percent average last week. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 3.39 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

Don’t Panic Over Stock Market Mayhem

The housing market likely won’t be deeply affected by the sharp decline in stocks over the last two days because underlying economic fundamentals remain strong, says Lawrence Yun, chief economist for the National Association of REALTORS®. Jobs are being created, workers are seeing wage gains, and there’s no recession on the horizon.

The Standard & Poor’s 500 stock index fell by more than 4 percent Monday, and the Dow Jones Industrial Average declined nearly 5 percent. As of late Tuesday, the S&P was down by almost 1.2 percent since the first of the year, although that comes after a year of double-digit gains.

One metric to watch is long-term bond rates, which historically have gone up as stocks go down. That link, however, hasn’t been as strong in the past few years. Investors tend to increase demand in bonds as an alternative to stocks, driving up yields, which can lead to higher mortgage rates. Since the start of the year, the average rate on a 30-year mortgage has risen, from 3.95 percent to 4.22 percent, according to Freddie Mac. That’s still low by historical standards.

—REALTOR® Magazine

Fed Move Doesn’t Suppress Mortgage Rates

The Federal Reserve may have voted to leave its short-term interest rates unchanged this week, but that didn’t stop lenders from moving up mortgage rates. Average mortgage rates are continuing an upward trend in 2018.

“The Federal Reserve did not hike rates this week, but the market views future hikes as a near certainty,” says Len Kiefer, deputy chief economist at Freddie Mac. “The expectation of future Fed rate hikes and increased borrowing by the U.S. Treasury is putting upward pressure on interest rates.”

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending Feb. 1:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.22 percent, with an average 0.5 point, rising from last week’s 4.15 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 4.19 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.68 percent, with an average 0.5 point, increasing from last week’s 3.62 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 3.41 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

Home Buyers Don’t Grasp ‘Mortgage Basics’

Many Americans begin looking for a home to buy without understanding the fundamentals of applying for a mortgage or what it takes to qualify for one, according to a new survey by Ally Home, a direct-to-consumer mortgage business.

Ninety-two percent of the more than 2,000 U.S. adults who responded to the survey admit they don’t know how much mortgage they can afford. Further, most say they’re confused about “rates” versus “points,” and only a third have a general idea of what their average closing costs might be. Only 8 percent are aware that the maximum debt-to-income ratio is usually 43 percent; most respondents believe it’s significantly lower or don’t know at all.

Ally Home is touting its free Mortgage Playbook, a resource that covers the basics of applying for a home loan. The book uses sports jargon to outline the mortgage application process, covering topics such as how to improve your financial fitness prior to applying for a loan, how to evaluate rate and points options, and how loan rates are determined.

Source: Ally Financial

Have We Seen the Last of 3% Mortgage Rates?

Average interest rates rose for the second consecutive week for the first time since last summer, the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage shot above 4 percent, Freddie Mac reports in its weekly survey.

“This is the highest weekly average for the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage since May of 2017,” says Len Kiefer, Freddie Mac’s deputy chief economist. “Inflation is firming, the Federal Reserve’s Beige Book indicates broad-based economic growth, and labor markets are tightening. This means upward pressure on long-term rates, like the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage, is building.”

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending Jan. 18:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.04 percent, with an average 0.6 point, up from last week’s 3.99 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 4.09 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.49 percent, with an average 0.5 point, increasing from last week’s 3.44 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 3.34 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

Mortgage Rates Ring in New Year With a Dip

Borrowers kicked off 2018 with a mortgage rate drop.  The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage is now down a quarter of a percentage point from a year ago.

“The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage fell four basis points from a week ago to 3.95 percent in the year’s first survey. Despite increases in short-term interest rates, long-term interest rates remain subdued.”  says Len Kiefer, Freddie Mac’s deputy chief economist.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending Jan. 4:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.95 percent, with an average 0.5 point, dropping from last week’s 3.99 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 4.20 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.38 percent, with an average 0.5 point, dropping from last week’s 3.44 percent average. A year ago, 15-year ARMs averaged 3.44 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

Home Loan Interest Rates Up Slightly This Week

“Thirty-year fixed mortgage rates have been bouncing around in a narrow 10 basis points range since October,” says Len Kiefer, Freddie Mac’s chief economist. “The U.S. average 30-year fixed mortgage rate increased 1 basis point to 3.94 percent in this week’s survey. The majority of our survey was completed prior to the surge in long-term interest rates that followed the passage of the tax bill. If those rate increases stick, we’ll likely see higher mortgage rates in next week’s survey.”

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending Dec. 21:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.94 percent, with an average 0.5 point, rising from last week’s 3.93 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year-rates averaged 4.30 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.38 percent, with an average 0.5 point, increasing from last week’s 3.36 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 3.52 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

Despite Fed Move, Mortgage Rates Hold Steady

Great News!  Mortgage rates were in a holding pattern this week, even after the Federal Reserve voted Wednesday to hike its benchmark interest rate.

“As widely expected, the Fed increased the federal funds target rate this week for the third time in 2017,” says Len Kiefer, Freddie Mac’s deputy chief economist. “The market had already priced in the rate hike, so long-term interest rates—including mortgage rates—hardly moved.”

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending Dec. 14:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.93 percent, with an average 0.5 point, dropping from last week’s 3.94 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 4.16 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.36 percent, with an average 0.5 point, the same as last week. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 3.37 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac