Mortgage Rates Barely Budge This Week

After last week’s first rate drop of the year, mortgage rates showed little change this week—a welcome sign for the week’s kickoff to the spring home shopping season. But home buyers and borrowers should expect several rate increases over the next few months, economists caution.

“The Federal Reserve raised interest rates [this week]—a much-anticipated move that comes as both U.S. and global economic fundamentals continue to strengthen,” says Len Kiefer, Freddie Mac’s deputy chief economist. “The Fed’s decision to raise interest rates by a quarter of a percentage point puts the federal funds rate at its highest level since 2008. The decision, while widely expected, sent the yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury soaring.” (Read: Fed Raises Rates: What This Means for Mortgages)

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending March 22:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.45 percent, with an average 0.5 point, rising from last week’s 4.44 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 4.23 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.91 percent, with an average 0.5 point, rising from last week’s 3.90 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 3.44 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

More Homeowners, Appraisers Agree on Values

Homeowners and appraisers are seeing more eye-to-eye when it comes to home values. Appraised values in February were, on average, just 0.53 percent below homeowner estimates—the fifth consecutive month where the gap between the two groups has been less than 1 percent, according to the National Quicken Loans Home Price Perception Index.

When shopping for a home—or even refinancing a current mortgage—consumers should always keep the changes in their local market in mind before estimating a home’s value.”

The Home Price Perception Index chart and other data at article source: Quicken Loans

Home Loan Rates Post First Decline of 2018

Following nine consecutive weeks of increases, borrowers finally got some relief this week with mortgage rates. The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage posted its first week-over-week decrease of 2018.

“Tuesday’s Consumer Price Index report indicated inflation may be cooling down; headline consumer price inflation was 2.2 percent year over year in February,” says Len Kiefer, Freddie Mac’s deputy chief economist. “Following this news, the 10-year Treasury fell slightly. Mortgage rates followed.”

Freddie Mac reported the following national averages for the week ending March 15:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.44 percent, with an average 0.5 point, dropping from last week’s 4.46 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 4.30 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.90 percent, with an average 0.5 point, dropping from last week’s 3.94 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 3.50 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

Renovations Homeowners Are Eyeing This Year

Outdoor improvements, including decks, patios, and landscaping, remained highest on owners’ to-do lists for the fifth consecutive year. Interior renovations also are popular: Nearly a third of homeowners say they plan to remodel a bathroom, and more than one in four say they plan to update their kitchen, according to a recent survey by LightStream Home Improvement

65 percent of survey respondents saying they’ll take on at least some of the work. Thirty-five percent of the group say they’ll do the entire project on their own.

Also, budgets for renovations are increasing. Forty-five percent of homeowners who are planning a renovation project say they’re willing to spend $5,000 or more—a record high for the survey. The number of respondents who plan to spend $35,000 or more doubled from 2017.

Source: “Home Improvement Ramps Up in 2018,” The LightStream blog (Feb. 27, 2018)

Household Net Worth Reaches Record High

Americans are feeling richer. Household net worth neared $100 trillion in the final quarter of last year, falling into record territory, according to new data released by the Federal Reserve on Thursday. Rising stock markets and property prices were attributed to the jolt in the fourth quarter. (Household net worth is the value of all of a consumer’s assets, like stocks and real estate, minus any liabilities like mortgage and credit card debt.)

Household net worth increased more than $2 trillion last quarter to a record $98.7 trillion in the final three months of last year, according to the report. Households in the U.S. saw their net worth increase to nearly seven times their disposable personal income in 2017.

More at source: “U.S. Household Net Worth Pushes Further Into Record Territory,” The Wall Street Journal (March 8, 2018) [Log-in required.] and “Stock Market Lifts U.S. Household Wealth to $98.7 Trillion,” The Associated Press/USA Today (March 8, 2018)

Mortgage Rates Tick Up for 9th Straight Week

Borrowers were once again faced with rising mortgage rates this week. The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage continues to be at its highest average in four years.

“The U.S. weekly average 30-year fixed mortgage rate rose 3 basis points to 4.46 percent in this week’s survey, its highest level since January 2014.” explains Len Kiefer, Freddie Mac’s chief economist.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending March 8:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.46 percent, with an average 0.5 point, increasing from last week’s 4.43 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 4.21 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.94 percent, with an average 0.5 point, increasing from last week’s 3.90 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 3.42 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

Survey: Home Owners Worried, Buyers Excited

Consumer sentiment is following an unusual trend for a seller’s market: Home buyers are upbeat, but homeowners are less so, according to ValueInsured’s latest quarterly survey of about 1,600 consumers. Why the divergence between buyers and owners? Some homeowners may feel stuck, while buyers are anxious to jump into real estate before home prices and mortgage rates rise further.

Fifty-eight percent of homeowners surveyed say they want to sell but are holding off because they don’t want to purchase again at today’s higher prices. Fifty-nine percent of owners say they believe buyers in their area are overpaying for a home, according to the survey.

Buyers still have plenty of concerns, such as saving for a down payment and eroding housing affordability, particularly in the nation’s hottest housing markets. Some say they are ready to make some sacrifices to afford their first home.

We suggest you view charts and data at: ValueInsured Modern Homebuyer Survey

More Buyers Gamble With Sight-Unseen Offers

Thirty-five percent of home buyers who purchased a home in November and December said they made an offer on the home without seeing it first in person, according to a newly released survey of more than 1,500 home purchasers conducted by the real estate brokerage Redfin. That is up from 33 percent in May 2017 and from 19 percent in June 2016.

By age group, millennial home buyers are the most likely to make an offer on a home without visiting it first, at 45 percent, researchers found. Younger adults may be more comfortable with relying on information they find online about properties for sale and the neighborhoods, researchers note.

For buyers who can’t see the property in person first, some real estate professionals are relying on FaceTime video call tours or 3-D virtual tour programs to give them a better idea of the interiors.

Source: “Sight-Unseen in 2017: 35% of Homebuyers Bid on a Home Before Seeing it in Person,” Redfin (Feb. 26, 2018)

Mortgage Rates Still Climbing, Not Fading!

The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage shows little signs of stopping its gradual move upwards week to week. This marks the seventh consecutive week for higher mortgage rates, the highest since April of 2014, and rates continue to be at a four-year high.

“Mortgage rates have followed U.S. Treasury’s higher in anticipation of higher rates of inflation and further monetary tightening by the Federal Reserve. Following the close of our survey, the release of the [Federal Open Market Committee] minutes for February 21, 2018, sent the 10-year Treasury above 2.9 percent. If those increases stick, we will likely see mortgage rates continue to trend higher.” says Len Kiefer, Freddie Mac’s chief economist.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending Feb. 22:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.40 percent, with an average 0.5 point, rising from last week’s 4.38 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 4.16 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.85 percent, with an average 0.5 point, increasing from last week’s 3.84 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 3.37 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

Home Equity Loans allow Interest Deduction?

Taxpayers can continue to deduct the interest they pay on home equity loans when the funds are used for home improvements, the IRS confirmed in a statement on Wednesday. The status of home equity deductions has been in question following the limits on the mortgage interest deduction included in recent tax reform legislation passed in December.

In its statement, the IRS said despite the restrictions on mortgages, taxpayers can, in most cases, still deduct interest on home equity loans, a home equity line of credit, or a second mortgage.

The tax law,  the interest on a home equity loan used for building an addition to an existing home would generally be deductible. But interest on the same loan used to pay personal living expenses, like credit card debt, would not be.

The IRS offered scenario’s and details in describing how the new tax law works in these reference sources: IRS; “IRS Says Interest on Home Equity Loans Can Still Be Deducted,” Accounting Today (Feb. 21, 2018); National Association of Home Builders