‘Tiny Homes’ May Have a Wider Buyer Pool

A new survey confirms that consumers are definitely intrigued by smaller homes, often described as less than 600 square feet. More than half of adults recently surveyed–or 53 percent—said “yes” or “maybe” when asked if they would ever consider the possibility of buying such a small home, according to a recent study by the National Association of Home Builders. That means a majority of adults would consider moving into a tiny home at some point in the future, the NAHB notes.

Younger generations tend to find tiny homes more appealing than older age groups. More than half of millennials and Generation X members said they were open to the idea of a tiny home. However, only 45 percent of baby boomers and 29 percent of seniors said they’d be willing to entertain the idea.

But local zoning laws may curtail the prevalence of just how big the tiny-home movement gets. However, there has been a recent momentum among some local jurisdictions to relax some of those restrictions.

Source: “Tiny Homes Have Potential Buyers,” National Association of Home Builders’ Eye on Housing blog (Feb. 7, 2018)

Tiny Homes Are Making a Bigger Mark

Tiny houses are trending bigger nationwide. Interest in small-home living among the public has gained momentum since the recession, and made some Americans crave a simpler, less expensive way to live, according to U.S. News & World Report.

These small homes, often built on a trailer and portable, tend to be under 700 square feet. They tend to cost a fraction of a typical home, as low as $10,000 or up to $100,000, depending on the size.

TV shows are giving viewers a peek at this new type of living, especially on networks that HGTV that have shows featuring small-home living such as “Tiny House Hunters,” “Tiny House Nation,” and “Tiny House, Big Living.”

Source: “The Big Impact of Tiny Homes: How Little Houses Are Changing Real Estate,” U.S. News & World Report (Aug. 5, 2016)