Mortgage Rates at 10-Month Low

 “The U.S. economy remains on solid ground, inflation is contained, and the threat of higher short-term rates is fading from view, which has allowed mortgage rates to drift down to their lowest level in 10 months,” says Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist. “This is great news for consumers who will be looking for homes during the upcoming spring home buying season.”

Freddie Mac reports the following averages for the week ending Feb.7:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.41 percent, with an average 0.4 point, dropping from last week’s 4.46 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 4.32 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.84 percent, with an average 0.4 point, dropping from last week’s 3.89 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 3.77 percent.
Source: “Mortgage Rates Drop,” Freddie Mac (Feb. 7, 2019)

Young Adults Living With Parents’

More young adults are still living with their parents and not branching out on their own, and that could have a long-term, negative impact to their finances, according to a new study from the Urban Institute. Researchers found there is no long-term advantage financially for young adults who live with their parents.

The share of young adults aged 25 to 34 who live with their parents rose from nearly 12 percent in 2000 to 22 percent in 2017. Young adults who stayed in their parents’ home longer did not end up buying more expensive homes or have lower mortgage debts later on than those young adults who moved out earlier, the study showed. Researchers say this suggests that “living with parents does not better position young adults for home ownership, a critical source of future wealth, and may have negative long-term consequences for independent household formation.”

Source: “Young Adults Living in Parents’ Basements,” Urban Institute (January 2019)

Fed Puts Brakes on Rates

The Federal Reserve voted to leave interest rates unchanged last Wednesday and signaled that it’s not in any hurry to resume raising rates in 2019. Fed Chairman Jerome Powell used words like “patient” to describe the Fed’s latest approach to increases. His change in tone follows four rate hikes last year. The Fed’s benchmark rate is not directly tied to mortgage rates but does often influence them.

“In light of global economic and financial developments and muted inflation pressures, the committee will be patient as it determines what future adjustments to the target range for the federal funds rate may be appropriate,” a statement from the Federal Reserve read. The Fed said that economic activity has been “rising at a solid rate” and it does expect continued growth, but noted several political uncertainties—such as fallout from the government shutdown—and a slowdown in foreign economies as reason for a more cautionary approach.

Source: Freddie Mac and “Federal Reserve leaves rates unchanged, stresses patience,” HousingWire (Jan. 30, 2019)

Mortgage Rates Inch Up, But ‘Don’t Be Worried’

After weeks of moderating, mortgage rates moved up slightly this week. But aspiring home buyers may be able to breathe a sigh of relief: Freddie Mac economists revised their forecasts this week to predict 30-year fixed-rate mortgages to average below the 5 percent threshold for at least the next two years. “However, softening house price appreciation along with increasing inventory of homes on the market and historically low mortgage rates should give a boost to the spring home buying season,” says Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist.

The following are the national averages for the week ending Jan. 31:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.46 percent, with an average 0.5 point, rising from last week’s 4.45 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 4.22 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.89 percent, with an average 0.4 point, increasing from last week’s 3.88 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 3.68 percent.
Source: Freddie Mac

Housing Market Looking Brighter

Real estate indicators are starting to shift in favor of home buyers as the housing market sets its sights on spring. Mortgages are getting cheaper, housing inventories are growing, and home prices are rising at a slower pace.

The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage averaged 4.45 percent last week, Freddie Mac reports.  Late last year, mortgage rates were nearing the 5 percent threshold, but several weeks of decreases have offered some relief to home shoppers.

For home sellers, lower prices may not sound ideal. But housing analysts say sellers need to set a realistic price up front to find a buyer as the market shifts.

Source: “Housing Market’s Fundamentals Actually Turning Brighter,” The Washington Post (Jan. 23, 2019)

Hackers Access Data on Loans

Banks are in the process of trying to identify the customers affected and inform them of any possible account hacking.

“These documents contained highly sensitive data, such as Social Security numbers, names, phones, addresses, credit history, and other details which are usually part of a mortgage or credit report,” says security researcher Bob Diachenko, who discovered this.

Consumers are urged to change the passwords on their financial accounts. The database itself that was hacked was not password protected, but in the data theft, hackers may have gained access to personal information that hackers could then use to access a person’s other accounts.

Source: “Fraud Alert: Your Mortgage Info Could Be at Risk,” USA Today (Jan. 23, 2019) and “Document Management Company Left Credit Reports Online,” SecurityDiscovery.com (Jan. 23, 2019)

Will Lower Rates Escalate Sales?

The real estate industry will soon see what kind of impact weeks of declining mortgage rates have had on home sales. Will it provide the boost some experts are predicting?

Since early November, the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage has fallen nearly half a percentage point, from 4.94 percent to 4.45 percent, at the end of this week. This could provide an important incentive for potential home buyers to make a move. The 30-year rate, which didn’t budge in the latest week of reporting, was on a downward trend for six consecutive weeks prior. Existing-home sales in November were already bouncing back from unusually low volume in the summer months, gaining 1.9 percent month over month, due largely to stability in the overall economy, according to data from the National Association of REALTORS®. But when NAR’s data for December existing-home sales is released next Tuesday, it may reveal whether lower mortgage rates have escalated sales gains.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending Jan. 17:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.45 percent, with an average 0.4 point, unchanged from last week’s average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 4.04 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.88 percent, with an average 0.4 point, dropping from last week’s 3.89 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 3.49 percent.
Source: Freddie Mac; “The slowing U.S. housing market may have finally bottomed,” Yahoo! Finance (Jan. 17, 2019)

Loan Rates Fall to 9-Month Lows

Mortgage rates posted more drops this week, lowering the borrowing costs of potential home shoppers and refinancers. “Lower mortgage rates combined with continued income growth and lower energy prices are all positive indicators for consumers that should lead to a firming of home sales,” says Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending Jan. 10:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.45 percent, with an average 0.5 point, falling from last week’s 4.51 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.99 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.89 percent, with an average 0.4 point, dropping from last week’s 3.99 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 3.44 percent.
Source: Freddie Mac

Who Will Shape the 2019 Market?

The most popular names in transactions show that women, millennials, and Hispanics are shaping up as dominating forces in the housing market, according to a new analysis from realtor.com®. Ten of the top 20 and seven of the 10 fastest-growing buyer first names are mostly millennial female names, researchers found. Home deeds that contained predominantly millennial first names rose 5.3 percent year over year. Home sales associated with traditionally Hispanic first names increased 4.1 percent year over year.

Hannah, Austin, Alexis, Logan, and Taylor—three of which are predominantly female names—were the five fastest-growing first names on home sales deeds in 2018. Their frequency saw an average increase of 22 percent from 2017. However, the first names of Michael, John, David, James, and Robert remained the top five first names on sale deeds by sheer volume, but those names have decreased 3 to 5 percent since 2017, according to the study.

Source: “Women, Millennials, and Hispanics Will Shape the Future of Housing,” realtor.com® (Jan. 9, 2019)

Home Loan Interest Rates Update!

The new year is kicking off with lower mortgage rates for home shoppers and people looking to refinance their mortgages. The benchmark 30-year fixed-rate mortgage dipped to a 4.51 percent average this week, Freddie Mac reports.

“Low mortgage rates combined with decelerating home price growth should get prospective home buyers excited to buy,” says Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist.

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending Jan. 3:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 4.51 percent, with an average 0.5 point, falling from last week’s 4.55 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 3.95 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.99 percent, with an average 0.4 point, dropping from last week’s 4.01 percent average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 3.38 percent.
Source: Freddie Mac